The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

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The Annual Student and Alumni Reception in Washington, D.C.

The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center hosted its annual Student and Alumni Reception in Washington, D.C. on Thursday, June 15, 2017. Each year the occasion provides an opportunity for the Center’s First-Year Fellows, newly arrived to the city and ready to embark on their 8-week summer internships, to meet and network with their Dartmouth Alumni mentors.

“The First-Year Fellows program is a great example of the partnership between the Rockefeller Center and Dartmouth alumni, who find many ways to contribute to the education of each successive cohort of Dartmouth students,” noted the Center’s Director, Professor Andrew Samwick, during his brief remarks at the reception.

This summer, 23 First-Year Fellows, all members of the Dartmouth Class of 2020, are serving fellowships in a diverse range of host organizations with a Dartmouth alumni mentor.

The Class of 2020 First-Year Fellows in D.C.

The Class of 2020 First-Year Fellows arrived in Washington, D.C. this week and are currently participating in the Civic Skills Training (CST) component of the program. The Fellows have already completed four on-campus training sessions during the spring term and will now spend an additional five days of training in Washington, D.C. before their fellowships begin on Monday.

The CST curriculum covers everything from public speaking, networking, and advocacy writing to project management, team work, and professionalism and is designed to prepare the students for a successful internship experience and beyond. The week includes classroom sessions facilitated by Deputy Director Sadhana Hall and Program Officer Sam Williamson, workshops hosted by area alumni, and excursions around the city to familiarize the students with Capitol Hill and the surrounding area.

Rocky and Me: Sam Libby ’17 Senior Reflection

In the Rocky & Me series, Seniors reflect on their experiences during their time at Dartmouth.

The Rockefeller Center is the reason I came to Dartmouth College. During the 2012 election, I realized that the esoteric policy world in Washington affects me directly, and I wanted my college experience to prepare me to make a meaningful impact in that space. When I visited Dartmouth for the first time during Dimensions, I was choosing between Dartmouth and one other university, and while the open houses and barbeques that I attended were fun, they did not speak to my intellectual interests. On a whim, and at the urging of my mother, I attended the Rockefeller Center’s Open House, where I met Professor Ron Shaiko and learned about the public policy programs. I committed to Dartmouth immediately afterward in one of the best decisions of my life. Here's why I'm so grateful to Rocky for helping me make that fateful choice:

Class of 2017 Public Policy Minors

The Rockefeller Center is proud to announce that twenty-nine members of the Class of 2017 have completed their degree requirements with a minor in public policy.

Intentionally flexible and broad in scope, a minor in public policy prepares students for both public and private sector careers in a variety of policy-related fields, such as health, energy, international relations, social justice, the domestic economy, poverty, gender issues, urban development, law, journalism, education, or the environment.

Ten of the Class of 2017 policy minor graduates were also First-Year Fellows and four were Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Most participated in the Policy Research Shop and had the opportunity to testify on their findings before New Hampshire and Vermont government officials.  

Brianna Ager, ECON

Students' Reflections on Ivy Policy Conference

The triumph of the Ivy Conference is not the keynote speakers, not the carefully planned tracks, not even the beauty of Columbia's New York campus: it is the minute interactions between students from different colleges. For this I am intensely grateful. Few other events or organizations could make these interactions possible not just possible, but easy. It could be an intense as a heated debate about the appropriate response to administrative inaction or as sublime as a conversation struck up in an elevator that leads to a lasting friendship--these are the heart of the ivy conference and the reason I'm drawn to eat it each year. The effect of these interactions in aggregate is to get a better perspective on our common problems and to come up with common solutions.

Empowering Young Women in the Upper Valley

We learned so much through planning Sister to Sister 2017 and it was an invaluable experience for all involved. First, we learned about the various logistics involved with planning a conference of this size and magnitude. The key to the success of the conference was starting to prepare very early on by noting what was and was not successful from Sister to Sister 2016. Link Up has already began to talk about Sister to Sister 2018, which will be essential to making next year's conference even more successful than this year’s.

Further, it was so important that we were able to receive input from so many different people involved with the conference. We sent out surveys to the facilitators asking for feedback and we used the 2016 feedback to improve this year’s conference. Additionally, all of the Link Up executives edited the schedule for the conference. All of this collaboration ensured the program was reviewed from a variety of perspectives and therefore we could do our best to cover all important topics for middle school girls.

Rocky and Me: Deep Singh '17 Senior Reflection

In the Rocky & Me series, Seniors reflect on their experiences during their time at Dartmouth.

Senior Celebration BBQ

The Rockefeller Center hosted its annual Senior Celebration BBQ on Tuesday, May 30th in honor of the Class of 2017. Festivities had to be moved indoors due to a rainy day, but the uncooperative weather did not dampen the lively conversation and fellowship over a delicious meal catered by Wicked Awesome BBQ.

Many seniors in attendance spent a significant portion of their time at Rocky over the past four years taking classes, participating in leadership programs, or working as student program assistants. Read their reflections about these experiences in our Rocky and Me series of website articles.

The event was organized by Program Officer Eric Janisch, who in addition to event planning, co-manages the Center’s Management and Leadership Development Program (MLDP) and the Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors program (D-LAB).

Notes from the Field: Danny Li '19

Danny Li '19 interned at the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training for the 2017 winter term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

Introducing Eric Janisch, Rockefeller Center Program Officer

Eric Janisch is the Rockefeller Center’s newest Program Officer, having joined the Center’s staff in January of 2017. As a Program Officer for Co-Curricular Programs, Eric contributes as a co-manager to both the Management and Leadership Development Program (MLDP) and the Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors program (D-LAB) and aids in organizing a variety of public programs – including the Rocky Student Veteran lunch as well as the campus visit by the 22nd Secretary of the Army, Eric Fanning.

Eric is also working to organize a vocational seminar over sophomore summer through the Professional Preparation Program (P3). Specifically, he is helping connect students with likeminded alumni who have non-traditional career paths they reached after completing traditional liberal arts majors.

“We’re hoping to give them an understanding of what they can do outside of the normal corporate culture or traditional industries,” said Eric.

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