The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

The 2008 New Hampshire State of the State Poll

Analysis of Results
PRS Briefs
PRS Policy Brief 0809-01
December 11, 2008
Lauren
Bowman
Kelsey
Clark
Karen
Doster
Elisabeth
Ericson
Schuyler
Evans
Michael
Fields
Tyler
Ford
Brian
Freeman
Jessica
Guthrie
Ana
Haggerty
Kristen
Liu
Alexandra
Mahler-Haug
Hope
McIntyre
Alicia
Modeen
Jennifer
Murray
Danielle
S.
O'Bannon
Anya
Perret
Chaise
Raines
Raymond
Rodriguez
Christine
Souffrant
Derek
Summerville
Clark
Warthen
Christopher
Zablocki
Kahlie
Dufresne
Editor
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Executive Summary

During the week of April 28-May 2, 2008, students in the Policy Research Shop conducted a telephone survey of New Hampshire registered voters. Calls were made between the hours of 6:30pm and 9:30pm on Monday through Thursday evenings. Additional calls were made during daytime hours on Tuesday through Friday when requests were made to call during the day. Over the course of the week, a total of three attempts were made to contact each of the registered voters drawn in the sample. A total of 401 survey interviews were completed during the week, yielding an error rate of +- 5.0 percent at a 95 percent confidence interval. Survey respondents were asked a wide range of questions relating to the current political and economic state of affairs in New Hampshire. The sample drawn is quite representative of the voting population in New Hampshire; just over half of the respondents were male (51.7 percent) while just under half were women (48.3 percent). Respondents were divided evenly between the two congressional districts (47.9 percent from the 1st Congressional District and 52.1 percent from the 2nd Congressional District). The mean and median ages of the respondents were 56.7 and 56, respectively. Regarding the partisan identification of the respondents, 27.6 percent are registered as Democrats, 29.8 percent are registered Republicans, and 42.6 percent are undeclared/independents.

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The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences