The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

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Lessons for Future Advocacy

The lessons that the 2017 UN Winter Youth Assembly offered me were truly remarkable. Never before have I been in the presence of so many passionate, motivated peers from around the world who have already begun to impact tangible change in their communities.

Keeping Faith with the Constitution

Pamela S. Karlan is the Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law and co-director of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic at Stanford Law School. Her primary scholarly interests involve constitutional litigation, particularly with respect to voting rights and antidiscrimination law. She has published dozens of scholarly articles. She is also the co-author of three leading casebooks and a monograph on constitutional interpretation: Keeping Faith with the Constitution.

Intersection of Public Policy and Investor Immigration

This past January, I attended the 2017 EB-5 & Investment Immigration Conference as part of my ongoing thesis research regarding investor immigration in the United States. My particular research focus centers on the intersection of the migration decision, public policy, and economic development—three central components of the EB-5 Program. At the conference, I was able to learn from different EB-5 stakeholders through conducting ethnographic work, which combined participant observation with semi-structured interviews. I was also able to participate in five workshops and attend twelve panels, which ranged from how to organize an EB-5 venture to future immigration policy in the current political climate. The qualitative data collected during the conference will be central to my investigation of stakeholder motivations, the impacts of EB-5 immigration on job creation and local development, and the role of public policy in mediating these two agendas.

International History Group Fosters Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Hosting regular meetings at the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center, the International History Group provides faculty from Dartmouth’s History, Government, and Economics departments the opportunity to share their interdisciplinary perspectives on global events. 

“It’s an opportunity for faculty, students, and post-docs to exchange ideas with some of the globe’s most interesting and distinguished international historians,” says one of the group’s conveners, William C. Wohlforth, Daniel Webster Professor of Government. “This is important not just because of the intrinsically fascinating nature of the research these visitors present, but because it helps build bridges between history and other international fields, including political science, public policy and economics.  Every policy problem has a historical dimension and most of the data we use to test conjectures are historical in nature.”

The group not only features distinguished Dartmouth faculty, but also invites leading scholars from other universities to share their knowledge of the political, economic, intellectual, and cultural histories of global issues.

How Leaders Add Value to Organizations

On February 23rd, the Rockefeller Leadership Fellows program welcomed Harry Sheehy, the Director of Athletics and Recreation at Dartmouth, in a session titled “Contemporary Leadership Competencies.” The son of two Williams graduates, Mr. Sheehy himself graduated from William College in 1975, after which he played eight years of basketball with Athletes-in-Action. He later became the head coach of the Williams Men’s Basketball team, followed by an appointment to the Williams Director of Athletics position, where he led the school to 17 Division III National Championships. Education, Mr. Sheehy believes, is of utmost importance, particularly in the realm of athletics, something that served as a great motivation for his move to Dartmouth. Sports themselves might be insignificant, “Except for the fact that they’re not,” Mr. Sheehy stated, “There’s more to life than sports, but there’s more to sports than sports.” Athletics are an opportunity to develop leadership, create a vision, and empower members to carry out that vision.

A New Perspective on Finance Careers

I’d like to thank Rockefeller Mini Grants for providing me with the opportunity to attend the 2017 Venture Capital and Private Equity Conference at Harvard Business School. It was an amazing experience and I am so grateful to have had the privilege of attending this event.

The Venture Capital and Private Equity Conference at Harvard Business School is an annual conference that brings together students, professors, and venture capital/private equity professionals from around the world. The conference features four keynote speakers, each bringing a unique perspective on the venture capital and private equity industry. In addition, the conference features various panel discussions covering topics such as growth equity, cross-border investing, and healthcare investing.

Community Leaders Share Leadership Lessons

This article was written by Ed Fox, General Manager of the Co-Op Food Stores and originally appeared in The Cooperator on February 28, 2017. Click here to read it on The Cooperator.

Since starting at the co-op last fall, I’ve been consistently impressed with the quality of leadership throughout our organization. Some people lead with strong, bold voices. Others are quiet and stoic and lead by example. In short, there are many ways to lead. And your co-op is so well-known for leadership that the best and brightest visit us to learn by our example.

A Female Dominated Space in Mathematics

Thanks to the support from the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences at Dartmouth College, I was able to attend the Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics from February 3-5 at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. At the conference, I presented the results of my research project in applied mathematics, connected with experts in the field, and made friends with fellow female mathematicians. The experienced was both rewarding and eye opening.

Policy Research Shop Testimony: March 1st, 2017

PRS Students Testify on Autonomous Vehicles (AV) Legislation across the United States, as the New Hampshire House Transportation Committee Considers Adopting State AV Laws

 

On Wednesday, March 1, 2017, Neil Kamath '17, Sam Libby '17, and Paulomi Rao '19, students from The Class of 1964 Policy Research Shop of the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center at Dartmouth College, traveled to Concord to present their research findings to the New Hampshire House Transportation Committee, Chaired by Rep. Steven Smith. The students presented their policy brief, "Developing Autonomous Vehicle Policy in New Hampshire: Evaluating Policy Options across the United States," while discussing HB314, sponsored by Chairman Smith. The bill would establish the first set of regulations in New Hampshire that specifically address autonomous vehicles, or "self-driving cars." The students presented to the Committee and responded to a range of questions from the Committee members.

 

The Future of Investment and Entrepreneurship

The Harvard Business School Venture Capital and Private Equity Conference on Saturday, January 28th, 2017 was attended by students, entrepreneurs, and investment professionals. The event kicked off with a morning keynote address by Seth Klarman, author of the famous value investing tome, Margin of Safety, and founder of the Baupost Group. Mr. Klarman is still CEO and President Baupost, the now 35 year old hedge fund that has made one of the highest returns of any fund in history. One dollar invested at the inception of the Baupost Group would now be worth over $700. Mr. Klarman talked about how his investment strategy is intensely focused on the microeconomics of companies, in the context of the macroeconomics. He discussed how you can correctly predict macroeconomic and geopolitical events and outcomes, but you cannot predict how the market will react to them.

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