17W

Notes from the Field: Sydney Latimore '18

Sydney Latimore ’18 interned in the European Parliament branch in Brussels, Belgium for the 2017 Winter term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

Over the course of the winter 2017 term, I had the opportunity to intern with the European Parliament branch in Brussels, Belgium. In the first week I was tossed into the melee of preparation for the monthly trip to Strasbourg, France where Members of Parliament (MEPs) travel to meet and vote on legislative proposals. I quickly learned how my work fit into the larger mission of Parliament and I was just as quickly introduced to the complexities of a governing body that is responsible for 28 unique countries.

Notes from the Field: Samuel Emmah ’18

Samuel Emmah ’18 interned in the Office of the Public Defender in Hartford, Connecticut for the 2017 Winter term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

This past winter, I was able to intern in the Office of the Public Defender in Hartford, Connecticut which provides legal representation to indigent clients of the surrounding Hartford metropolitan area who are at risk of a prison sentence. As a leader in public defender work, the state of Connecticut directly funds the public defender’s office to utilize dedicated attorneys, investigators, and social workers to ensure the protection and enforcement of a defendant’s constitutional rights. In Connecticut, the superior courts are separated into a GA court, which handles misdemeanors and lower class felonies, and a JD court, which provides representation to clients facing higher-class felonies.

Notes from the Field: Reem Chamseddine ’17

Reem Chamseddine ’17 interned with the Institute for the Study of War for the 2017 winter term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report. 

This past winter, I had the opportunity to intern with the Institute for the Study of War (ISW) which is a think tank that researches and analyzes developments in regions critical to American national security and American foreign policy. The mission of ISW is to provide real-time, independent, and open-source analysis of political processes, military operations, and insurgent activity in Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Russia. Additionally, ISW attempts to bridge the military-civilian knowledge gap. ISW research is typically consumed in the defense community, the diplomatic community, and among policymakers.

Notes from the Field: Rachel Scholz-Bright ‘18

Rachel Scholz-Bright ‘18 interned in the Civil Rights Division of the Massachusetts Attorney General's Office for the 2017 winter term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report. ​

Notes from the Field: Oliver Engelhart ’18

Oliver Engelhart ’18 interned in the Office of Senator Gillibrand from New York for the 2017 winter term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report. ​

This past winter I had the opportunity to intern in the Office of Senator Gillibrand from New York. I took everything I hoped to take away from this experience. I gained an insight into domestic politics, worked on legislative issues I was passionate about, and developed relationships with staffers, alums, and friends in the capitol. While I have primarily focused m studies at Dartmouth on international politics and Asian studies, working as an intern in the Senate was my chance to learn about American politics, and explore a part of the United States I have never been exposed to. The past few months have been a chaotic time in DC, given the inauguration and tension in the capitol, but I definitely think this was the opportune moment to experience the senate in full swing. During my time in the office I attended many of the Presidential Cabinet Nominee hearings, summarized briefings, and worked on research projects for staffers.

Notes from the Field: Danny Li '19

Danny Li '19 interned at the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training for the 2017 winter term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

Introducing Eric Janisch, Rockefeller Center Program Officer

Eric Janisch is the Rockefeller Center’s newest Program Officer, having joined the Center’s staff in January of 2017. As a Program Officer for Co-Curricular Programs, Eric contributes as a co-manager to both the Management and Leadership Development Program (MLDP) and the Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors program (D-LAB) and aids in organizing a variety of public programs – including the Rocky Student Veteran lunch as well as the campus visit by the 22nd Secretary of the Army, Eric Fanning.

Eric is also working to organize a vocational seminar over sophomore summer through the Professional Preparation Program (P3). Specifically, he is helping connect students with likeminded alumni who have non-traditional career paths they reached after completing traditional liberal arts majors.

“We’re hoping to give them an understanding of what they can do outside of the normal corporate culture or traditional industries,” said Eric.

Notes from the Field: Daniel Shlien '18

Daniel Shlien '18 interned at the Office of Economic Policy in the U.S. Treasury Department​ for the 2017 winter term with the support of Mr. E. John Rosenwald Jr. '52 Public Affairs Fund. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

This winter I had the opportunity to intern within the Office of Economic Policy in the U.S. Treasury Department, which is an office consisting of about twenty-five PhD economists and a handful of other staff who perform research a wide range of economic issues and advise the Secretary of the Treasury on those issues. During my internship, I was one of four interns who assisted economists in their research by cleaning up datasets, performing analyses, creating models, producing graphs and other visuals, and writing memos on our findings. One of the best parts about working in the Economic Policy office is its size –there are no research assistants and each economist is usually the only expert in their field in the office. Therefore, I worked directly with leading economists, people whose opinions on a subject, whether it be housing or healthcare, move the needle in the world of policy.

Notes from the Field: Cheron Laughing '19

Cheron Laughing '19 received the support of the Class of 1964 Fund to intern at the Navajo Nation Washington Office (NNWO) for the 2017 winter term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This winter I interned in the Navajo Nation Washington Office (NNWO) which was founded in 1984 to more actively safeguard this unique relationship and pursue the fulfillment of all responsibilities of the historic Treaty of 1868. It serves as a direct advocate of the Navajo Nation, a tribal government entity, with Congress, the White House and federal agencies. Specifically, the NNWO monitors and analyzes congressional legislation, all the while discerning best strategies and practices concerning national policies and budgets that affect all 300,000 enrolled members of the Navajo Nation.

Dartmouth Oxford-Exchange Student: Anwita Mahajan '17

Through the Dartmouth-Oxford Exchange Program, undergraduate students are able to spend a term living and studying at the University of Oxford’s Keble College. As a fully integrated member of the Oxford community, these students take courses in the British tutorial system that relate to their major and course of study at Dartmouth. Anwita Mahajan ’17, an Economics major, participated in this exchange term during the winter of 2017.

As one of the few off-campus exchange programs offered by the Economics department, Anwita was immediately drawn to the exchange opportunity at Oxford. Not only was studying abroad one of Anwita’s goals for her undergraduate career, she found this exchange program as the perfect way to balance the chance to travel with the chance to experience student life at such a prestigious university as Oxford.

Pages

Close
The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences