The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Internships

The Annual Student and Alumni Reception in Washington, D.C.

The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center hosted its annual Student and Alumni Reception in Washington, D.C. on Thursday, June 15, 2017. Each year the occasion provides an opportunity for the Center’s First-Year Fellows, newly arrived to the city and ready to embark on their 8-week summer internships, to meet and network with their Dartmouth Alumni mentors.

“The First-Year Fellows program is a great example of the partnership between the Rockefeller Center and Dartmouth alumni, who find many ways to contribute to the education of each successive cohort of Dartmouth students,” noted the Center’s Director, Professor Andrew Samwick, during his brief remarks at the reception.

This summer, 23 First-Year Fellows, all members of the Dartmouth Class of 2020, are serving fellowships in a diverse range of host organizations with a Dartmouth alumni mentor.

Notes from the Field: Danny Li '19

Danny Li '19 interned at the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training for the 2017 winter term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

Notes from the Field: Daniel Shlien '18

Daniel Shlien '18 interned at the Office of Economic Policy in the U.S. Treasury Department​ for the 2017 winter term with the support of Mr. E. John Rosenwald Jr. '52 Public Affairs Fund. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

This winter I had the opportunity to intern within the Office of Economic Policy in the U.S. Treasury Department, which is an office consisting of about twenty-five PhD economists and a handful of other staff who perform research a wide range of economic issues and advise the Secretary of the Treasury on those issues. During my internship, I was one of four interns who assisted economists in their research by cleaning up datasets, performing analyses, creating models, producing graphs and other visuals, and writing memos on our findings. One of the best parts about working in the Economic Policy office is its size –there are no research assistants and each economist is usually the only expert in their field in the office. Therefore, I worked directly with leading economists, people whose opinions on a subject, whether it be housing or healthcare, move the needle in the world of policy.

Notes from the Field: Cheron Laughing '19

Cheron Laughing '19 received the support of the Class of 1964 Fund to intern at the Navajo Nation Washington Office (NNWO) for the 2017 winter term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This winter I interned in the Navajo Nation Washington Office (NNWO) which was founded in 1984 to more actively safeguard this unique relationship and pursue the fulfillment of all responsibilities of the historic Treaty of 1868. It serves as a direct advocate of the Navajo Nation, a tribal government entity, with Congress, the White House and federal agencies. Specifically, the NNWO monitors and analyzes congressional legislation, all the while discerning best strategies and practices concerning national policies and budgets that affect all 300,000 enrolled members of the Navajo Nation.

Notes from the Field: Robert He '19

Robert He '19 was funded by the Class of 1964 to intern at the Office of Public Engagement at the White House during the 2016 fall term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

In the fall of 2016, I had the immense privilege of serving as an intern in the Obama Administration at the White House. I served in the Office of Public Engagement, and helped to fulfill the President’s goal of making the White House as open and participatory as possible. In my role, I helped the White House engage with various organizations and stakeholders to further the Administration’s objectives.           

Notes from the Field: Noah Goldstein '18

Noah Goldstein '18 interned at the U.S. Department of Commerce during the 2016 Fall Term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report

During the fall of 2016 I worked for the U.S. Department of Commerce – Trade Administration & Commercial Services in the U.S. Embassy at London as an international trade assistant. The organization is the trade branch of the government and, as this one was based in the UK, was responsible for encouraging U.S. exports to the UK. Through the Obama administration’s SelectUSA policy, the organization also has the added responsibility of encouraging FDI, or foreign direct investment, from the UK going into the US. Thus, any UK companies looking to set up an office in the U.S. can go to Commercial Services to receive support. Commercial Services acts as a middle man between interested US companies and actors in the markets in the UK, often coordinating meetings between the two. For example, firms trying to sell a product in the UK are often able to get in a room of around 30 potential clients/distributors and pitch their product, thanks to the efforts of my office.

Internship Tip Series: Internship Housing

Housing Tip Sheet

This tip sheet was compiled from the feedback of previous interns. Scroll to the bottom for links that have been helpful to students in the past.

Tips:

1. Start Early: Affordable internship housing gets competitive (especially for the summer term), so start as early as possible. Start looking even before you have secured an internship, and put down a deposit as soon as your internship is confirmed.  Since rates often increase with time, we encourage you to not rely on or wait for funding decisions from the Rockefeller Center or other Dartmouth funding sources – make a commitment and make a plan-B both for housing and funding.

Notes from the Field: Lauren Bishop '19

Lauren Bishop interned at the White House Office of Presidential Correspondence during the 2016 Fall Term with support from Mr. E. John Rosenwald Jr. '52 Public Affairs Fund. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

During the fall of 2016 I had the distinct privilege of interning in the White House Office of Presidential Correspondence under President Barack Obama. As an intern in the Hard Mail division of the Mail Analysis team, I read and responded to hundreds of letters a day on behalf of the President in order to address the concerns of the American people. I was also able to give voice to compelling writers by flagging their letters for staff members who would review and then place them in the President’s nightly briefing book. Ten letters a day were chosen, encompassing a range of topics penned by writers throughout America in order to inform the President of the public’s opinion. Furthermore, I coordinated with staff to compose an internal compilation of letters for relevant policy offices and recorded the opinions of the American people during shifts on the White House comment line.

Notes from the Field: Yoga Acharya '19

Yoga Acharya '19 interned with Senator Casey's Foreign Policy and National Security Team during the 2016 summer term with support from the Peter McSpadden Public Affairs Fund. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

Notes from the Field: Victoria Chi '17

Victoria Chi '17 interned at the policy office of the Center for Global Health at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention during the 2016 summer term with support from the John K. Springer '53 Memorial Fund. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

Over the summer of 2016, I interned at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the government agency that works to protect the health of Americans and of populations worldwide. Within CDC, I was in the policy office of the Center for Global Health (CGH), the center responsible for reducing the global burden of disease, strengthening the health capacity of developing countries, and preventing, detecting, and responding to disease threats across the globe. 

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