The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Mini-Grants

Lessons for Future Advocacy

The lessons that the 2017 UN Winter Youth Assembly offered me were truly remarkable. Never before have I been in the presence of so many passionate, motivated peers from around the world who have already begun to impact tangible change in their communities.

Intersection of Public Policy and Investor Immigration

This past January, I attended the 2017 EB-5 & Investment Immigration Conference as part of my ongoing thesis research regarding investor immigration in the United States. My particular research focus centers on the intersection of the migration decision, public policy, and economic development—three central components of the EB-5 Program. At the conference, I was able to learn from different EB-5 stakeholders through conducting ethnographic work, which combined participant observation with semi-structured interviews. I was also able to participate in five workshops and attend twelve panels, which ranged from how to organize an EB-5 venture to future immigration policy in the current political climate. The qualitative data collected during the conference will be central to my investigation of stakeholder motivations, the impacts of EB-5 immigration on job creation and local development, and the role of public policy in mediating these two agendas.

A New Perspective on Finance Careers

I’d like to thank Rockefeller Mini Grants for providing me with the opportunity to attend the 2017 Venture Capital and Private Equity Conference at Harvard Business School. It was an amazing experience and I am so grateful to have had the privilege of attending this event.

The Venture Capital and Private Equity Conference at Harvard Business School is an annual conference that brings together students, professors, and venture capital/private equity professionals from around the world. The conference features four keynote speakers, each bringing a unique perspective on the venture capital and private equity industry. In addition, the conference features various panel discussions covering topics such as growth equity, cross-border investing, and healthcare investing.

A Female Dominated Space in Mathematics

Thanks to the support from the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences at Dartmouth College, I was able to attend the Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics from February 3-5 at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. At the conference, I presented the results of my research project in applied mathematics, connected with experts in the field, and made friends with fellow female mathematicians. The experienced was both rewarding and eye opening.

The Future of Investment and Entrepreneurship

The Harvard Business School Venture Capital and Private Equity Conference on Saturday, January 28th, 2017 was attended by students, entrepreneurs, and investment professionals. The event kicked off with a morning keynote address by Seth Klarman, author of the famous value investing tome, Margin of Safety, and founder of the Baupost Group. Mr. Klarman is still CEO and President Baupost, the now 35 year old hedge fund that has made one of the highest returns of any fund in history. One dollar invested at the inception of the Baupost Group would now be worth over $700. Mr. Klarman talked about how his investment strategy is intensely focused on the microeconomics of companies, in the context of the macroeconomics. He discussed how you can correctly predict macroeconomic and geopolitical events and outcomes, but you cannot predict how the market will react to them.

Research Prospects at Earth Science Conference

Attending the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco was an extremely valuable experience for me. I was given the opportunity to present the Earth Sciences research that I had been conducting as a Sophomore Scholar; I was presenting evidence of the impact of a 2011 Chilean volcanic eruption on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide. The meeting was the largest gathering of earth and planetary scientists in the world, with over 25,000 scientists present. It was marvellous to see the wide variety of scientific research being conducted, and also witnessing the importance of fine details within the fields. I presented in the first poster session of the conference, alongside other ice scientists, and it was valuable to hear feedback on my research and to discuss the work with more experienced scientists.

The Power to Make Change

The driving theme of the Ivy Leadership Summit (ILS) was Impetus, and the events and speakers were meticulously planned to reflect that. The experience has truly convinced me that as students, we have the power to make a change now. Speakers such as Heather Anderson, Senior VP of Programs at Global Health Corps, emphasized that this conference was a catalyst. We did not have to wait to gain experience if we had an idea. We should find some resources and work to implement our visions now. I loved meeting peers who had the same passions that I did for the work needing to be done in the field of Global Health. ILS was an incredible opportunity to expose myself to the different opportunities in Global Health. It took a broad interest of mine and gave me the chance to meet leaders in the field. I now have more direction in what I want to explore career wise. I especially loved two key speakers and the advice they shared.

Henry Blodget:

Education Reform at Ivy Council Conference

The main purpose for this conference at Yale of the Ivy Council was impetus: the initiative one needs to do something magnificent. While at the conference, there was a heterogeneous mix of influential keynote speakers from various careers who spoke with us passionately about determination and drive in their respective fields. Then, I had the chance to obtain a more specialized experience at the conference by choosing a certain career sector to contemplate; I chose the education section. There were many opportunities in breakout sessions to converse with leaders in this sector. From what they have said about their beliefs and opinions on education in general, there seems to be a common thread amongst their thoughts: the education system has been quite static in their progress for decades. As well-established schools become more prosperous, others in the inner-cities and abroad become more financially and academically detached. I saw this first hand, as I interned at a charter school in Bronx, NY during my winter break in freshman year: Kids were not attending classes, teachers felt indifferent, and the school’s ratings steadily declined.

Making a Difference at Ivy Summit

The Ivy Summit was a valuable experience because it provided the opportunity for empowered students from Ivy League institutions along with Stanford and MIT to meet and share their ideas for change and partner together. The conference instilled the message in each attendee that we can make a difference today and that the world needs us to put an effort into changing the systems that aren’t working. The panels and sessions I attended varied from advice on how to bring my ideas to fruition, how to make policy useful by thinking of who it is impacting and taking my irrelevant experiences out of the equation, the responsibility of being resilient that is accepted in positions of leadership, to how to fail forwards. The speakers I had the pleasure of listening to and interacting with included the CEO of Business Insider, the CEO of Teach for America, and the Ambassador for initiatives of Asian American and Pacific Islanders, but also fellow undergraduate students who had ideas ranging from how to educate women in Afghanistan who cannot leave their houses to attend school to how to bring a greater variety of language courses to their own institution.

Strengthening the Dartmouth Outing Club

I had two major takeaways from this conference. First was a deeper appreciation for the resources, excitement, and student engagement that the Dartmouth Outing Club has. The second takeaway was key ideas on how the DOC can take tangible steps forwards to engaging more cultures on campus in the outdoors.

The first takeaway came over the course of the conference. I attended a total of 12 or so workshops. During these, I slowly came to appreciate how privileged the DOC is. Having administrative support, and student enthusiasm, as well as the long and rich history of the DOC has allowed us to excel past most other programs in terms of our abilities to organizing and implement orientation programs for freshman, introduce novice’s to the outdoors, and create campus buy-in to the values of an outdoor experience. This newfound perspective helped me reflect more on the relationship that the DOC has with Dartmouth. I think often students crave more; More resources for trips, more facilities and gear, but don’t stop and appreciate what we already have.

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