The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Rockefeller Leadership Fellows

How Leaders Add Value to Organizations

On February 23rd, the Rockefeller Leadership Fellows program welcomed Harry Sheehy, the Director of Athletics and Recreation at Dartmouth, in a session titled “Contemporary Leadership Competencies.” The son of two Williams graduates, Mr. Sheehy himself graduated from William College in 1975, after which he played eight years of basketball with Athletes-in-Action. He later became the head coach of the Williams Men’s Basketball team, followed by an appointment to the Williams Director of Athletics position, where he led the school to 17 Division III National Championships. Education, Mr. Sheehy believes, is of utmost importance, particularly in the realm of athletics, something that served as a great motivation for his move to Dartmouth. Sports themselves might be insignificant, “Except for the fact that they’re not,” Mr. Sheehy stated, “There’s more to life than sports, but there’s more to sports than sports.” Athletics are an opportunity to develop leadership, create a vision, and empower members to carry out that vision.

Emergent Leadership for Life

Kate Hilton ’99, a senior faculty member at ReThink Health, spoke to the Rockefeller Leadership Fellows on February 9, 2017. Kate is an expert in issues such as designing organizing efforts, teaching leadership skills, and strategizing with multi-stakeholder teams to take collective action.

Kate’s session began with a reading of her father’s high school graduation speech, as well as his eulogy. The two readings, although far apart in time, displayed the importance of consistency. Her father’s high school speech was focused on tolerance and the pursuit of vocational mastery. These themes were also clear in his eulogy, as his fellow doctors saw that his care for both patients and other doctors alike knew no bounds.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Alisa White '17

This series introduces the 2016-2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

Beyond Dartmouth, leadership can determine whether or not you make it out of the wilderness before dark or destroy a common resource. On my ENVS FSP this fall, we faced both of these situations: the latter while working with a community in rural Namibia. We spent three days in a community conservancy helping pick up trash along their riverbed and fielding community input for a waste management plan. We witnessed how limited leadership and lack of institutions for waste management led to degradation of the natural environment. In RLF, I hope to reflect on my leadership experiences to prepare myself to be a leader in the fields of sustainability and natural resource management.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Carter Sullivan ’17

This series introduces the 2016-2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

While at Dartmouth, I have come to realize that there are multiple styles of leadership and that my methods can be just as effective as someone else’s if I use them correctly. I am most interested in a leader’s ability to get people to “buy in” to their ideas. It is always extremely impressive to observe a leader who can come up with an idea, present it effectively, and gain the support of the team who also believes in the idea. When a leader can accomplish this, projects are more sustainable as the people involved do not need to be constantly pressured to execute because in believing in the idea, they put the pressure on themselves. Not only is this ability a powerful leadership tool, it is also an extremely important tool for affecting change.

Leading People and Delivering Results

In his session “Leading People and Delivering Results,” Dr. David Ager facilitated discussion over a Harvard Business School case study. The case focused on whether a senior management director at Morgan Stanley, Paul Nasr, should promote his star revenue producer, Rob Parson. Parson has been extremely successful in generating revenue for the firm, but has an aggressive personality that strongly conflicts with Morgan Stanley’s team-oriented culture. The session began with Dr. Ager encouraging fellows to brainstorm reasons for why Parson should be promoted. Fellows debated the impact of Parson’s qualifications and behaviors, and analyzed the potential pros and cons of promotion. Specifically, fellows argued whether Nasr should put greater weight on Parson’s revenue production or his leadership capabilities. At the beginning, discussion focused primarily on Parson’s behavior. However, after further discussion, the debate started to center on whether Nasr had succeeded as a manager.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Mary Sieredzinski ’17

This series introduces the 2016-2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

Leadership is a learning process. The Rockefeller Leadership Fellows program allows me to participate in a dialogue with other students who are as passionate about leadership as I am.

Mobilization, motivation, and mentorship are three of leadership’s most interesting aspects.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Deep Singh '17

This series introduces the 2016-2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

I believe that my participation in RLF will help improve some of my underdeveloped leadership qualities and equip me with the tools necessary for effective management.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Morgan Sandhu ’17

This series introduces the 2016-2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

The RLF program functions dually as a capstone for my experience with leadership at Dartmouth while also helping to ensure that I am being an effective leader during my senior year. Learning how to adapt my leadership style and push myself beyond my leadership comfort zone is the next step in my leadership journey. I view RLF as the only campus leadership program that can provide this final stage for growth.

At Dartmouth, my most meaningful long term commitments have been Mock Trial, the Policy Research Shop, and my sorority, Chi Delta. I have also completed several programs to help me lead effectively, including Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors Program, Civic Skills Training, and the Management and Leadership Development Program.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Shaun Sengupta ’17

This series introduces the 2016-2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

In today’s technology environment, there are great engineers, designers, and developers. However, there is a certain lack of leadership within this domain – a type of leadership that wisely meshes others’ skills together to create an environment of innovation, efficiency, and satisfaction in one’s work. From my experience in the automotive technology industry, I observed a gap in cohesion between scientists and engineers. Seeing this disconnect, I strive to be the person that can bring together such people’s talents to accelerate future technology. With the interpersonal, speaking, and teamwork skills developed and applied in RLF, I will transform these goals into a more palpable reality.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Priya Ramaiah ’17

This series introduces the 2016-2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

During my time at Dartmouth, I have learned the most from opportunities that allowed me to constantly question the belief systems and structures operating around me as well as within me, and use these critical moments as the basis for dialogue and development. This reflective process is one of the reasons I chose my course of study – an anthropology major modified with women’s and gender studies and a public policy minor. RLF’s emphasis on knowing and understanding oneself in the context of leadership is what drew me to the program, because I believe that strong leaders are based on strong principles.

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