The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Rockefeller Leadership Fellows

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Jessie Colin '18

This series introduces the 2017-2018 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

How Leaders Use Storytelling and Exemplify Integrity

This week, I had the privilege of introducing Sadhana Hall, the Deputy Director of the Rockefeller Center, at our Rocky Leadership Fellows session. During my introduction, I told my peers that not only is Sadhana very accomplished, but she is also one of the most open and genuine people I’ve encountered during my life. Sadhana welcomes people into the deepest parts of her own life so willingly that it’s easy to feel connected and cared for and to want to share everything on your mind, as well.

The Importance of Understanding Your Own Leadership Strengths

On September 14th, Jay Davis ’90, the coordinator for the First Year Student Enrichment Program and the King Scholars Program, shared valuable words of wisdom with respect to the flexibility and thoughtful reflection necessary to create cohesive group environments with the Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Davis spoke from a number of previous experiences working within a range of group and leadership setting, and engaging students in an interactive discussion on how our own leadership styles and tendencies affect how we are able to work with one another to achieve goals we collectively establish.

He began the session by having each student share with the group a characteristic they find essential to exemplary leadership. Students provided a range of attributes, from humility to constructive communication. He, then, had us consider a time we found another person’s leadership challenging, alluding to the idea that conflicting leadership styles can impede group cohesion and effectiveness.

Class of 2018 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows

Front Row (left to right): Rajiv Ramaiah, Maria Jose Auil, Charlotte Blatt, Samuel Colello, Abhilasha Gokulan, Alyssa Heinze, Kristen Virkler, Dale Li, Raunak Bhojwani

2nd Row (left to right): Gricelda Ramos, Christopher Huberty, Lucia Pierson, Jonathan Chu, Emma Marsano, Carolyn McShea, Jessica Colin, Arati Gangadharan, Zoe Snow, Kaina Chen

3rd Row (left to right): Matthew Sindelar, Akanksha Wasan, Marley Peters, Daniel Propp, Caroline Berens, Jarrett Taylor 

Class of 2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows

Front Row (left to right): Asaf Zilberfarb, Brendan Barth, Meghana Mishra, Taylor Ng, Morgan Sandhu, Sarah Han, Nicole Castillo, Kevin Donahoe, and Deep Singh 

2nd Row (left to right): Shivam Chadha, Mary Sieredzinski, Regan Plekenpol, Alisa White, Shaun Sengupta, Julia Marino, Priya Ramaiah, Kalie Marsicano, and Jonathan Busam

3rd Row (left to right): Carter Sullivan, Benjamin Rutan, Terence Hughes, Cedar Farwell, Alexander Chivers, Arun Ponshunmugam (withdrew), Chileta Dim, and Devyn Greenberg

Class of 2017 Public Policy Minors

The Rockefeller Center is proud to announce that twenty-nine members of the Class of 2017 have completed their degree requirements with a minor in public policy.

Intentionally flexible and broad in scope, a minor in public policy prepares students for both public and private sector careers in a variety of policy-related fields, such as health, energy, international relations, social justice, the domestic economy, poverty, gender issues, urban development, law, journalism, education, or the environment.

Ten of the Class of 2017 policy minor graduates were also First-Year Fellows and four were Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Most participated in the Policy Research Shop and had the opportunity to testify on their findings before New Hampshire and Vermont government officials.  

Brianna Ager, ECON

Rocky and Me: Deep Singh '17 Senior Reflection

In the Rocky & Me series, Seniors reflect on their experiences during their time at Dartmouth.

How Leaders Add Value to Organizations

On February 23rd, the Rockefeller Leadership Fellows program welcomed Harry Sheehy, the Director of Athletics and Recreation at Dartmouth, in a session titled “Contemporary Leadership Competencies.” The son of two Williams graduates, Mr. Sheehy himself graduated from William College in 1975, after which he played eight years of basketball with Athletes-in-Action. He later became the head coach of the Williams Men’s Basketball team, followed by an appointment to the Williams Director of Athletics position, where he led the school to 17 Division III National Championships. Education, Mr. Sheehy believes, is of utmost importance, particularly in the realm of athletics, something that served as a great motivation for his move to Dartmouth. Sports themselves might be insignificant, “Except for the fact that they’re not,” Mr. Sheehy stated, “There’s more to life than sports, but there’s more to sports than sports.” Athletics are an opportunity to develop leadership, create a vision, and empower members to carry out that vision.

Emergent Leadership for Life

Kate Hilton ’99, a senior faculty member at ReThink Health, spoke to the Rockefeller Leadership Fellows on February 9, 2017. Kate is an expert in issues such as designing organizing efforts, teaching leadership skills, and strategizing with multi-stakeholder teams to take collective action.

Kate’s session began with a reading of her father’s high school graduation speech, as well as his eulogy. The two readings, although far apart in time, displayed the importance of consistency. Her father’s high school speech was focused on tolerance and the pursuit of vocational mastery. These themes were also clear in his eulogy, as his fellow doctors saw that his care for both patients and other doctors alike knew no bounds.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Alisa White '17

This series introduces the 2016-2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

Beyond Dartmouth, leadership can determine whether or not you make it out of the wilderness before dark or destroy a common resource. On my ENVS FSP this fall, we faced both of these situations: the latter while working with a community in rural Namibia. We spent three days in a community conservancy helping pick up trash along their riverbed and fielding community input for a waste management plan. We witnessed how limited leadership and lack of institutions for waste management led to degradation of the natural environment. In RLF, I hope to reflect on my leadership experiences to prepare myself to be a leader in the fields of sustainability and natural resource management.

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