The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

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Voxmasters Recap: Elevator Pitches: Getting to the Point

As part of MLDP, we encourage student participants to attend other Rockefeller Center programs in order to enrich their Dartmouth experience. Read two student accounts of a Rockefeller Center program, and for more information about MLDP, click here.

The theme of this week's Voxmasters was the Elevator Pitch, which student leaders Sarah and Shoshana described as a situation where we only had two minutes to convey a pitch for a project or idea to a powerful individual.

Each participant in the group was given five minutes to come up with a pitch. The student leaders suggested that we be concise, animated and genuine in our pitches. Furthermore, they encouraged us to show why our pitches were important and explain how the individual could be beneficial to us. After putting together notes about our pitches, each of us went to the front of the room and presented our idea to the imaginary individual that we had chosen.

Law Professor James Fleming to Discuss “The Myth of Strict Scrutiny for Fundamental Rights” on 10/31 at 4:30 PM

 

In constitutional law, it is commonplace to say that the Supreme Court applies “strict scrutiny” in protecting fundamental rights under the Due Process Clause – almost automatically invalidating any statute restricting such rights. But James Fleming, Boston University Law Professor and incoming Vice President of Law for the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy, proposes a new theory, one that shakes the very framework of the U.S. legal system.

Fleming’s lecture, “The Myth of Strict Scrutiny for Fundamental Federal Rights,” will outline this controversy and its effects on the current justice system. He suggests that certain justices are utilizing this misconception to push their own agenda, one that increases difficulty in protecting rights of privacy and autonomy. Fleming argues that opponents of these ideas have yet to realize that they are perpetuates a system of injustice and misconstrued mindsets. The lecture will discuss a new framework: the use of “reasoned judgment” in protecting “ordered liberty.”

RLF Recap: "Exploring the Meaning of Trust" with Former Governor of New Hampshire, John Lynch

The Rockefeller Leadership Fellows had the pleasure of welcoming Governor John Lynch, the previous governor of New Hampshire, for a discussion about trust and its roles in corporate and public sector leadership. Governor Lynch started off the session by examining a Harvard Business School case study dealing with James Burke, a past CEO of Johnson & Johnson. Students brought up the different ways in which Burke excelled as a leader, including passion, listening to others, and taking risks. The focal point of the evening, trust, was woven into the discussion through an evaluation of the Tylenol-caused deaths in the case study. Governor Lynch asked us to critically assess our definition of the word “trust,” in the context of both sold products and interpersonal relationships. 

RLF Recap: Decision Making in Leadership with Jay Davis '90


On October 24th, Jay Davis ‘90, the current coordinator of FYSEP, SEAD, and several Tucker outreach programs at Dartmouth, spoke to the fellows about the different sides of leadership. He began by recounting his own experiences in the realm of education and coaching, pointing out the fact that we must adapt our styles of leadership to the followers at hand and evaluate what things really matter to you. Consequently, each fellow explained a leadership trait they valued, with responses ranging from humility to accountability to passion. Bad leadership can often become an impediment to the function of a team or organization, so the fellows were then asked to share examples of when leaders exhibited clashing personalities or ideals.

Recap: "Reign of Error: Responding to the Assault on Public Education" with Diane Ravitch

 
Read a student's account of a Rockefeller Center public program. For more information, about MLDP, click here.

Voxmasters: Interview Preparations

As part of MLDP, we encourage student participants to attend other Rockefeller Center programs in order to enrich their Dartmouth experience. Read a student account of a Rockefeller Center program, and for more information about MLDP, click here.

MLDP Recap: "21st Century Public Service" with David Uejio

 
As part of MLDP, we encourage student participants to attend other Rockefeller Center programs in order to enrich their Dartmouth experience. Read a student account of a Rockefeller Center program, and for more information about MLDP, click here. 

I am very glad I attended Dave Uejio's session "21st Century Public Service," which turned out to be an awesome discussion. Uejio covered public service, what it is, why students should consider careers in public service, etc. One of the main takeaways was the difference between politics and policy. Uejio told us that "Policy is action," eloquently explaining that politics is more focused on advocating to accomplish something while policy is concerned with efficiently operationalizing policies. Uejio also told us how he really doesn't care much for politics because at the end of the day, what matters most is not necessarily what policies should or shouldn't be passed, but rather what policies are being done and whether they are achieving the desired result.

MLDP Recap: Week 6 Fall 2013

 
Read a student's account of our most recent session in our Management Leadership and Development program below. For more information about MLDP, click here.

This Tuesday, we heard from David Uejio, Strategy Program Manager at the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau, in his session on “Presentation Design for the User Experience.” Mr. Uejio began his lecture by conveying to us the importance of presentation design. Indeed, as students at Dartmouth, we encounter all kinds of presentations as we attend lectures each day.

Mr. Uejio went on to share with us a framework for "demonstrating superior thinking through visualization." He discussed the importance of designing for a specific audience with a specific purpose in mind, and emphasized details like font and color palette. He also relayed the importance of designing slides for ourselves, in order to command material. Throughout his talk, Mr. Uejio shared with us some slides that he created for work purposes and we discussed why they were effective.

MLDP Recap: "Networking Strategies for a New Generation" with Kaneisha Grayson

 
As part of MLDP, we encourage student participants to attend other Rockefeller Center programs in order to enrich their Dartmouth experience. Read a student account of a Rockefeller Center program, and for more information about MLDP, click here. 

On Sunday, I had the amazing opportunity to be a part of a Webinar by Kaneisha Grayson on “Networking Strategies for a New Generation.” Not only were her experiences and education extremely relevant to the occasion, but Grayson was a pleasure to hear as a speaker and made her talk simple and practical to follow. She emphasized the importance of networking in today’s world as an effective tool to receive guidance and encourage others to support and cheer for you. On the practical front, she discussed LinkedIn profiles, who to connect with on LinkedIn and the art of sending effective emails.

"Reign of Error: Responding to the Assault on Public Education" with Diane Ravitch - Oct 23 at 7:30 PM

Over 88% of students in the United States receive a public education. Many view the provision of a free education to be the hallmark of the U.S. democracy. Nonetheless, education in the U.S. and more specifically its privatization has become quite a hot-button issue. In Diane Ravitch’s public program on Wednesday, October 23, she will examine federal programs such as George W. Bush’s No Child Left Behind and Barack Obama’s Race to the Top in relation to higher test scores, decreased graduation rates and the rise of private educational opportunities.
What is driving the success of U.S. education? How are policymakers failing to address the root causes of educational shortcomings?  How can we fix it?

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