The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

17S

Introducing the Class of 2020 First-Year Fellows

Since 2007, the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center has offered first-year students and Dartmouth alumni a dynamic program called First-Year Fellows (FYF). This program provides first-year students the opportunity to engage in public policy early in their Dartmouth careers.

For students the program starts on campus during the fall and winter terms as potential participants are required to take PBPL 5: Introductory to Public Policy and a research methods course. They are also expected to participate in the Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors program. 

During the spring term, Fellows are selected through a competitive application and interview process and then matched with an alumni mentor and placement organization best suited to their academic and career interests.

Notes from the Field: Marcus Thompson '19

Marcus Thompson ’19 interned with the Naval History and Heritage Command for the Spring 2017 term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

This past spring, I had the opportunity to intern at the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) which is an Echelon II command of the US Navy dedicated to supporting the Navy’s mission through public affairs, historical analysis, and direct mission support. While interning at NHHC, I was able to contribute to all aspects of this mission. Working out of the Naval library and archives at the Washington Naval Yard, I accessed exclusive primary sources and official histories otherwise unavailable to the public. During my internship, I worked with Dr. John Sherwood, an expert in Naval operations in the Vietnam War and in Libya. He has been an invaluable teacher and mentor. I am confident my research, historical writing, and grasp of military history have improved immensely due to this internship.

Notes from the Field: Priya Sankar '19

Priya Sankar ’19 interned with the Brookings Institution for the Spring 2017 term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

Notes from the Field: Katherine Royce ’19

Katherine Royce ’19 interned with EcoHealth Alliance (EHA) for the Spring 2017 term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

During the spring of 2017, I completed a health and policy internship with EcoHealth Alliance (EHA), a nonprofit research organization which uses the principles of local conservation and scientific inquiry to protect global health from the emergence of disease. By researching the interfaces between human, wildlife, and environmental health, EHA develops science and policy methods to prevent pandemics. I was assigned to work with the Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense to review the U.S. effort to strengthen national biodefense. In 2015, the Panel issued a set of recommendations to Congress, with the goal of improving U.S. capacity to prevent and respond to outbreaks of infectious disease, whether naturally occurring or intentionally introduced. During my internship, I assisted the Panel in researching how these recommendations had been implemented by federal and state governments and the agricultural industry, and my work will appear in its forthcoming report.

Notes from the Field: Alexandrea Adams ’18

Alexandrea Adams ’18 interned with New America, a non-partisan think tank in Washington, D.C., for the Spring 2017 term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

Spring 2017 MLDP Students in Excellence

Each session, participants from our Management and Leadership Development Program nominate their peers for excellence. When nominating, students are asked to explain why their nominees made their experience in MLDP more beneficial and/or how their nominees provide an excellent example of leadership in the program. At the end of the term, students must have perfect attendance and be nominated by their peers a number of times to pass MLDP with excellence. Below are the collaborated comments about those who completed the Management and Leadership Development Program with excellence in Spring 2017. Congratulations to you all!

Asaad Al Raeesi ’19 was always coming up with engaging questions and taking the time to be an active listener. He enjoyed turning criticisms into action and brought new and strong ideas to the group. This is why he has earned excellence in MLDP this term.

Rocky and Me: Sam Libby ’17 Senior Reflection

In the Rocky & Me series, Seniors reflect on their experiences during their time at Dartmouth.

The Rockefeller Center is the reason I came to Dartmouth College. During the 2012 election, I realized that the esoteric policy world in Washington affects me directly, and I wanted my college experience to prepare me to make a meaningful impact in that space. When I visited Dartmouth for the first time during Dimensions, I was choosing between Dartmouth and one other university, and while the open houses and barbeques that I attended were fun, they did not speak to my intellectual interests. On a whim, and at the urging of my mother, I attended the Rockefeller Center’s Open House, where I met Professor Ron Shaiko and learned about the public policy programs. I committed to Dartmouth immediately afterward in one of the best decisions of my life. Here's why I'm so grateful to Rocky for helping me make that fateful choice:

Class of 2017 Public Policy Minors

The Rockefeller Center is proud to announce that twenty-nine members of the Class of 2017 have completed their degree requirements with a minor in public policy.

Intentionally flexible and broad in scope, a minor in public policy prepares students for both public and private sector careers in a variety of policy-related fields, such as health, energy, international relations, social justice, the domestic economy, poverty, gender issues, urban development, law, journalism, education, or the environment.

Ten of the Class of 2017 policy minor graduates were also First-Year Fellows and four were Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Most participated in the Policy Research Shop and had the opportunity to testify on their findings before New Hampshire and Vermont government officials.  

Brianna Ager, ECON

Students' Reflections on Ivy Policy Conference

The triumph of the Ivy Conference is not the keynote speakers, not the carefully planned tracks, not even the beauty of Columbia's New York campus: it is the minute interactions between students from different colleges. For this I am intensely grateful. Few other events or organizations could make these interactions possible not just possible, but easy. It could be an intense as a heated debate about the appropriate response to administrative inaction or as sublime as a conversation struck up in an elevator that leads to a lasting friendship--these are the heart of the ivy conference and the reason I'm drawn to eat it each year. The effect of these interactions in aggregate is to get a better perspective on our common problems and to come up with common solutions.

Empowering Young Women in the Upper Valley

We learned so much through planning Sister to Sister 2017 and it was an invaluable experience for all involved. First, we learned about the various logistics involved with planning a conference of this size and magnitude. The key to the success of the conference was starting to prepare very early on by noting what was and was not successful from Sister to Sister 2016. Link Up has already began to talk about Sister to Sister 2018, which will be essential to making next year's conference even more successful than this year’s.

Further, it was so important that we were able to receive input from so many different people involved with the conference. We sent out surveys to the facilitators asking for feedback and we used the 2016 feedback to improve this year’s conference. Additionally, all of the Link Up executives edited the schedule for the conference. All of this collaboration ensured the program was reviewed from a variety of perspectives and therefore we could do our best to cover all important topics for middle school girls.

Pages

Close
The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences