The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

18F

NOTES FROM THE FIELD: CINDY ZHU '20

Cindy Zhu '20 interned at the US Securities and Exchange Commission during the 2018 fall term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This fall, I interned at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission with the Student Honors Program in New York, New York. I worked under the Division of Enforcement in the Market Abuse Unit (MAU), which plays an essential role in the SEC’s goal to maintain fair, orderly, and efficient markets for both Wall Street and Main Street. The Market Abuse Unit was created in 2010 as a platform to study traders, their decision-making, and how private information can flow between them. By hiring ex-traders, former FBI agents, and quantitative analysts, the MAU sought to harness the knowledge and experience of members of the industry to more effectively understand market manipulation. As a result, this “trader-based” approach has been instrumental in detecting illicit stock market activity.

NOTES FROM THE FIELD: JIMMY NGUYEN '21

Jimmy Nguyen '21 interned in the National Economic Council during the 2018 fall term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

For 13 incredible weeks this Fall, I had the honor of interning in the National Economic Council through the White House Internship Program. The National Economic Council has four objectives: move policy forward by coordinating the creation of economic policy, offer economic policy advice to the President, oversee the employment of said policy, and maintain consistency in action with the President’s goals. Interning for the National Economic Council has allowed me the privilege to see these goals advance firsthand during a flourishing economy.

NOTES FROM THE FIELD: VICTORIA MEYER '20

Victoria Meyer '20 interned at the World Bank in the Development Impact Evaluation (DIME) group during the 2018 fall term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This fall, I interned at the World Bank in the Development Impact Evaluation (DIME) group. According to DIME, the group generates high-quality and operationally relevant data and research to transform development policy, help reduce extreme poverty, and secure shared prosperity. It develops customized data and evidence ecosystems to produce actionable information and recommend specific policy pathways to maximize impact.

NOTES FROM THE FIELD: SARAH DRESCHER '20

Sarah Drescher '20 interned at the United States Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York (USAO-SDNY) in the Public Corruption Unit (PCU) during the 2018 fall term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This fall, I served as an intern at the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York (USAO-SDNY) in the Public Corruption Unit (PCU). The USAO-SDNY represents the U.S. government and prosecutes criminal and civil cases in Manhattan, the Bronx, and several other counties in southern New York. The USAO-SDNY is among the most well- regarded federal prosecutorial offices in the country in part because of the volume of wealth, industry, and business traffic that falls within its jurisdiction; this results in many high-level cases brought in this district. The PCU prosecutes criminal cases in which government officials have undertaken acts of corruption, including bribery and fraud.

NOTES FROM THE FIELD: OLIVIA FINE '20

Olivia Fine '20 interned for the Office of Senator Kirsten Gillibrand during the 2018 fall term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This fall, I had the privilege of interning for the Office of Senator Kirsten Gillibrand in Washington, D.C. Senator Gillibrand’s central office oversees a range of responsibilities from legislative duties, providing constituent services, managing press, to scheduling. As a legislative intern, the majority of my responsibilities were in the constituent services realm.

NOTES FROM THE FIELD: KARLA ROSAS '20

Karla Rosas '20 interned at the United States Supreme Court in the Office of the Clerk during the 2018 fall term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This fall, I interned at the United States Supreme Court in the Office of the Clerk. The United States Supreme Court processes about 10,000 petitions per year, yet only one percent of these petitions are granted and heard before the nine Justices.

NOTES FROM THE FIELD: AMELIA ALI '19

Amelia Ali '19 interned at the European Parliament during the 2018 fall term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This fall, I completed my internship at the European Parliament, the European Union's only directly-elected institution, where its 751 Members of Parliament (MEPs) represent each 28 European member countries. As a Robert Schuman Trainee, I assisted William Legge, who is the Earl of Dartmouth representing the South West England region and Gibraltar as an Independent MEP. He is a member of the Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy Group (EFDD), and he serves as the EFDD Group Coordinator for the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs and the Committee on International Trade.

18F PBPL 85: Global Policy Leadership Practicum Releases Its Final Report

The fall term course began in the classroom with Professor Charles Wheelan ’88 and a select group of students. This year students examined the genesis and implementation of the peace accords signed in 2016 between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC).

The final report synthesizes the lesson learned from 10 weeks of study on campus and two weeks of travel in Colombia. It provides relevant background, analysis, and actionable recommendations for the U.S. around the primary research question: What role, if any, does the U.S. have in the implementation of the Colombian peace process?

The two weeks in Colombia were spent speaking with relevant stakeholders in the U.S. and Colombian governments, nongovernmental organizations, social activists and humanitarians, conflict victims, art collectives, and former guerillas at FARC reintegration camps. 

“The importance of travel is twofold,” explains Wheelan, “One is this marriage of learning in the classroom and talking to people on the ground; and two, testing your hypotheses and listening to people who have very conflicting points of view.”

Danny Li '19 Attends the Student Conference on U.S. Affairs at West Point

Mini-Grant recipient, Danny Li '19 shares his experience attending the Student Conference on U.S. Affairs (SCUSA) hosted by the United States Miliary Academy at West point.

From October 24-27, 2018, I represented Dartmouth at the 70th Annual Student Conference on U.S. Affairs (SCUSA) hosted by the United States Military Academy at West Point. The conference was an eye-opening experience that allowed me to engage with high-level policymakers, expand my breadth and depth of knowledge on U.S. foreign policy, and form relationships with exceptional student-leaders.

A Conversation with Veterans Jason Hartwig ’06 and Brad Wolcott ’06

In honor of Veteran’s Day, the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center hosted a talk entitled “Imprints and Consequences of War: Personal Reflections of Dartmouth Alumni Veterans,” featuring Jason Hartwig ’06 and Brad Wolcott ’06. Both men were involved with ROTC during their time at Dartmouth, and both men went on to serve in the Armor Branch in the U.S. Army. The Armor Branch is an active combat branch with reconnaissance, surveillance, and infantry units. Armor soldiers are responsible for operating machinery, like tanks and helicopters, in combat and in intelligence-gathering activities.

Their paths do not represent the path of the average Dartmouth alumnus, nor do they represent the path of the average veteran. They were two in a handful of students involved with ROTC between 2002 and 2006, an experience Wolcott refers to as “idyllic.” Though most college-level ROTC programs focus on more technical aspects of army life, like marching and discipline, “we spent our entire time in the woods learning tactics, learning leadership, learning how to deploy soldiers in the field,” he says.

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