The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Alumni

Class of 2021 First-Year Fellow: Caterina Hyneman

As a First-Year Fellow, Caterina Hyneman ’21 interned at the Project on Government Oversight (POGO) under the mentorship of Danielle Downing ’99. The following is an excerpt from her final report.

This summer, I interned at the Project on Government Oversight (POGO). POGO is an independent, nonpartisan watchdog organization that champions government reforms to combat waste, fraud, and abuse. It not only conducts investigations into the federal government, but partners with government officials through projects such as the Congressional Oversight Training to help them perform oversight themselves. In addition, POGO publishes policy recommendations to suggest solutions and urge the government to act in bipartisan ways and in the best interest of the people they represent.

Dartmouth College Public Service Legacy: Samuel Everett Pingree, Class of 1857

This article is part of a series recognizing Dartmouth Alumni who have served in public office and demonstrated their commitment to the ideals of public service, leadership, and civic engagement.

Samuel Everett Pingree, Dartmouth class of 1857, was known in all areas of his life for his dedication: he was awarded the Medal of the Legion of Honor for his service in the civil war, he held the record for the longest service rendered to his community of Hartford, Vermont, and he was heavily involved with the alumni of the college, leading the procession of alumni at graduation for many years because he was always the oldest alumni present. As governor of Vermont, he earned the title of Vermont’s “grand old man,” a fitting summation of all that he did for the northeast.

Class of 2021 First-Year Fellow: Bruna Decerega

As a First-Year Fellow, Bruna Decerega ’21 interned at the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI) under the mentorship of Jeff Kelley ’69. Here is an excerpt from her final report.

This summer, I interned at the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI). USCRI is a non-profit institution committed to serving refugees, immigrants, unaccompanied minors, and survivors of human trafficking who fled their home country by force or by choice. The organization continuously advocates for these courageous individuals who left it all behind in search of a new, safer home in the United States.

At USCRI, I worked directly with the Development team in completing the following tasks: creating and completing a needs assessment report of seven USCRI field offices; writing blog posts to update supporters and followers on the work the organization is doing; analyzing social media data and suggesting ways to improve; analyzing and updating a list of previous donors and determining whether or not their current funding priorities align with USCRI’s mission.

A Conversation with Veterans Jason Hartwig ’06 and Brad Wolcott ’06

In honor of Veteran’s Day, the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center hosted a talk entitled “Imprints and Consequences of War: Personal Reflections of Dartmouth Alumni Veterans,” featuring Jason Hartwig ’06 and Brad Wolcott ’06. Both men were involved with ROTC during their time at Dartmouth, and both men went on to serve in the Armor Branch in the U.S. Army. The Armor Branch is an active combat branch with reconnaissance, surveillance, and infantry units. Armor soldiers are responsible for operating machinery, like tanks and helicopters, in combat and in intelligence-gathering activities.

Their paths do not represent the path of the average Dartmouth alumnus, nor do they represent the path of the average veteran. They were two in a handful of students involved with ROTC between 2002 and 2006, an experience Wolcott refers to as “idyllic.” Though most college-level ROTC programs focus on more technical aspects of army life, like marching and discipline, “we spent our entire time in the woods learning tactics, learning leadership, learning how to deploy soldiers in the field,” he says.

Dartmouth College Public Service Legacy: Rufus Choate, Class of 1819

This article is part of a series recognizing Dartmouth Alumni who have served in public office and demonstrated their commitment to the ideals of public service, leadership, and civic engagement.


Rufus Choate, Dartmouth Class of 1819, was a lawyer, orator, and politician who devoted himself to whatever task was before him. Best known for his career as a lawyer, he is said to have never lost a case, always performing the most eloquent speeches in defense of his clients. As a politician, his career was marked by the multitude of passionate speeches he gave, his dedication to his constituents, and the morals he stood for. He also lived his life as a continual scholar, never abandoning the learning that marked his time at Dartmouth. One of his biographers, Reverend Adams, noted that he was defined by “one of his prominent characteristics, the seizing upon every means to fit himself for every task with which he consented to grapple. It was in the genius, the nature of the man, to master every subject appertaining to his calling.”

A Lively Conversation with Endgame CEO Nate Fick ’99

The Rockefeller Center hosted a conversation with Nate Fick, the CEO of top computer software security firm, Endgame, operating partner of Bessemer Venture Partners, a Dartmouth ’99, and a member of the Dartmouth Board of Trustees. While at Dartmouth, Mr. Fick majored in Classics. He then went on to join the U.S. Marines, where he rose to become a member of the elite Marine Corps Force Reconnaissance team. After earning an MPA and MBA at the Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Business School, Mr. Fick was tapped by Michele Flournoy to run the Center for a New American Security before joining Endgame.

During the event, students heard Mr. Fick’s advice on leadership and navigating a successful career. He shared his key takeaways from the three main phases of his career: the military world, the non-profit world, and the for-profit or corporate world.

Dartmouth College Public Service Legacy: Salmon P. Chase, Class of 1826

This article is part of a series recognizing Dartmouth Alumni who have served in public office and demonstrated their commitment to the ideals of public service, leadership, and civic engagement.

A graduate of the Class of 1826, Salmon P. Chase is one of just three people to have served as a state governor and in all three branches of the United States government. After practicing law in Cincinnati, Chase entered public service: he served as U.S. Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, U.S. Secretary of Treasury, and Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Chase is perhaps best remembered for his contributions to the Union during the Civil War, during which he served as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. His efforts in this office are remembered to this day: Chase Bank, founded in 1877 and still in operation today, was named in honor of Chase and his help in financing the Union.

Dartmouth College Public Service Legacy: Levi Woodbury, Class of 1809

This article is part of a series recognizing Dartmouth Alumni who have served in public office and demonstrated their commitment to public service, leadership, and civic engagement.

Born in Francestown, New Hampshire in 1789, Levi Woodbury arrived Dartmouth College at the age of sixteen in 1806. Little is known about Woodbury during his time at Dartmouth. There is record like many of his contemporaries, that he helped pay for his tuition by teaching school in the neighboring towns around Hanover. Having graduated with honors in 1809, he traveled to Connecticut to study law at Tapping Reeve, America’s first law school. He didn’t stay long in Litchfield; before the year was over Woodbury returned home to hang out his shingle. At just twenty-two, he was admitted to the New Hampshire Bar, which allowed him to establish a small law office.

Dartmouth College Public Service Legacy: George Higgins Moses, Class of 1890

This article is part of a series recognizing Dartmouth Alumni who have served in public office and demonstrated their commitment to the ideals of public service, leadership, and civic engagement.

Few senators are entrusted with the range of leadership positions George Higgins “Mose” Moses (R-NH) attained during his fifteen years in public office. Born in Maine but an adopted son of New Hampshire, Moses gained a reputation in the Granite State through devotion to local journalism and unwavering support for the state’s Republican Party. Fluent in French and Greek with a skillful command of text-book Latin, even his detractors characterized him as the most gifted classical scholar to graduate from Dartmouth by 1890.

Dartmouth College Public Service Legacy: Thaddeus Stevens, Class of 1814

This article is part of a series of articles honoring Dartmouth Alumni who have served in public office and demonstrated their commitment to the ideals of public service, leadership, and civic engagement.

A man of single-minded purpose, Thaddeus Stevens, Dartmouth class of 1814, spent his life vehemently fighting for racial and social equality in America. Historian Hans Trefousse noted in a biography on Stevens that he "was one of the most influential representatives ever to serve in Congress.” According to Trefousse, Stevens “dominated the House with his wit, knowledge of parliamentary law, and sheer willpower….” However, Trefousse also concludes that Stevens’ influence was often limited by his extremism.

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