The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Alumni

First-Year Fellow Mentor: Michael Morris P'10 & ’14

The First-Year Fellows program is a unique opportunity for first-year students to engage meaningfully in public policy early in their Dartmouth careers. Each year, around 20 students are selected and placed in fellowships with Dartmouth alumni in Washington, D.C., who are willing to take on a significant mentoring role.

“At National Disability Institute, we are so pleased to again be a mentor to a First-Year Fellow. This summer, our Dartmouth student has again demonstrated a love of learning, strong analytical skills, and a motivation and commitment to advocacy, policy change and social justice. We have also benefitted from her time with us as we share insights about how policy evolves and she has shared her insights about government in action and the dynamic landscape we work in. Thank you for the opportunity to develop future leaders with such strong skills and values!” –Michael Morris, Executive Director of the National Disability Institute

Getting to Yes: Practical Applications of Negotiation Strategies

On September 17th, the Rockefeller Leadership Fellows welcomed Amanda Prentice ’06 to lead a session on the book “Getting to Yes: Practical Applications of Negotiation Strategies.” Ms. Prentice presented to fellows a high-level overview of the book; prior to the session, fellows prepared by reading the book, allowing for an engaging discussion. Ms. Prentice applied the lessons of negotiation to two potential real life examples: negotiating a higher salary and negotiating for lower rent. Following this discussion, fellows participated in a negotiation exercise.

Ms. Prentice highlighted that negotiation is not about “winning,” especially as negotiation is about dealing with other people. Her main focus was on avoiding positional bargaining as positions are concrete, while interests can be flexible and negotiated. Ms. Prentice also elaborated on the concept of BATNA (best alternative to a negotiated agreement), specifically that having a BATNA is above your bottom line and allows you to know your own interests.

First-Year Fellow Mentor: Judge John Mott '81

The First-Year Fellows program is a unique opportunity for first-year students to engage meaningfully in public policy early in their Dartmouth careers. Each year, around 20 students are selected and placed in fellowships with Dartmouth alumni in Washington, D.C., who are willing to take on a significant mentoring role.

 “Serving as a Rockefeller Center mentor has been an opportunity, a privilege, and a joy.  It has provided me the opportunity to give back to Dartmouth College for the education, experiences, and lifelong friendships for which I will always be grateful.  Mentorship has also allowed me the privilege of working with the fabulous Rockefeller Center staff in training and preparing young leaders.  And it has been a joy to mentor enthusiastic and bright students, to impart to them a sense of fairness and justice, and to help launch them with the understanding that they can make the world a better place through the law.” – Judge John Mott ’81, First-Year Fellow mentor since 2008.

First-Year Fellow Mentor: Judge John Mott ’81 

Leadership Directions

Our first session on Thursday, September 15th, 2016 was with Jay Davis, the director of the First Year Student Enrichment Program (FYSEP) and the King Scholars Program at Dartmouth.  Davis began his session by explaining that the RLF program will help us answer the question: “who am I, and who I ought to be?” “We can all be better leaders,” Davis explained, “and I don’t want to work with anyone who thinks that they have nothing left to learn.”

In the first activity, we all went around the room and responded to the question: what leadership quality do you most value? Intuition, flexibility of thought, empathy, clarity, humility, and self-awareness were among the traits that fellows mentioned. What struck me was that no two people came up with the same response to this relatively simple and straightforward question.

The Rockefeller Center's Annual Student and Alumni Reception

On Thursday, June 16, 2016, the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center hosted its annual Student and Alumni Reception in Washington, DC. Each year the occasion provides an opportunity for the Center’s First-Year Fellows, newly arrived to the city and ready to embark on their 8-week summer internships, to meet and network with their Dartmouth Alumni mentors.

“The First-Year Fellows program is a great example of the partnership between the Rockefeller Center and Dartmouth alumni, who find many ways to contribute to the education of each successive cohort of Dartmouth students,” noted the Center’s Director, Professor Andrew Samwick, during his brief remarks at the reception.

In addition to those involved with the First-Year Fellows program, the reception is open to all current Dartmouth students interning in DC during the summer and area alumni with a connection to the Center.

This year the reception took place at American University's School of International Service at the invitation of Lou Goodman '64, Emeritus Dean and Professor of International Relations at American University and a Rockefeller Center Board of Visitor.

Celebrating Law Day at Dartmouth: Alumni Attorneys Discuss Capital Punishment

Today there seems to be no shortage of divisive issues that polarize the American people and the parties that represent them, and one such issue is capital punishment. The death penalty has existed in the United States since colonial times, but opposition to it has been mounting over the centuries, with polls showing that opposition to the practice has increased by 75% in just the last 17 years. This is a multi-faceted issue, and there are many arguments that those who discuss capital punishment — whether they support or oppose it — must contend with, including moral relativism, the “cruel and unusual punishment” clause of the U.S. Constitution’s Eight Amendment, and the complexities of race, class, and gender and how they intersect with crime rates and sentencing. In this way, the discussion of capital punishment covers a wide range of topics, including philosophy, ethics, and law, and with the mounting opposition to capital punishment and the rising concerns regarding its constitutionality and even morality, it is a discussion that needs to be had.

First-Year Fellow Mentor: Edward Rynne '77

The First-Year Fellows program is a unique opportunity for first-year students to engage meaningfully in public policy early in their Dartmouth careers. Each year, around 20 students are selected and placed in fellowships with Dartmouth alumni in Washington, D.C., who are willing to take on a significant mentoring role.

First-Year Fellow Mentor: Jay Matson '91

The First-Year Fellows program is a unique opportunity for first-year students to engage meaningfully in public policy early in their Dartmouth careers. Each year, around 20 students are selected and placed in fellowships with Dartmouth alumni in Washington, D.C., who are willing to take on a significant mentoring role.

"There are many reasons that I volunteer to serve as a mentor, but my primary motivation is the opportunity to help current students. I hope that experience at FERC will lead to other opportunities, educationally and professionally. In that way, I am trying to “pay it forward” to the next generation of Dartmouth students in return for all the help that Dartmouth alumni offered me when I was just starting out." -- Jay Matson '91

Jay Matson '91. First-Year Fellow Mentor since 2013.

First-Year Fellow Mentor: Danni Downing '99

The First-Year Fellows program is a unique opportunity for first-year students to engage meaningfully in public policy early in their Dartmouth careers. Each year, around 20 students are selected and placed in fellowships with Dartmouth alumni in Washington, D.C., who are willing to take on a significant mentoring role.

First-Year Fellow Mentor: Deborah Hanmer '99

The First-Year Fellows program is a unique opportunity for first-year students to engage meaningfully in public policy early in their Dartmouth careers. Each year, around 20 students are selected and placed in fellowships with Dartmouth alumni in Washington, D.C., who are willing to take on a significant mentoring role.

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