The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Civil Rights

Public Program: Q&A with Professor Bruce Nelson, Dartmouth and the Civil Rights Movement Panelist

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the historic march from Montgomery to Selma, Alabama. For this year’s celebration of this momentous event, the Rockefeller Center explored Dartmouth’s connections to the Civil Rights Movement by hosting a faculty panel. After their talk, "We Were There…Dartmouth and the Civil Rights Movement," Courtney Wong '15 sat down with Bruce Nelson, a speaker on the panel, for an interview. This is the last interview in a series with each of the panelists.

J. Bruce Nelson taught US history at Dartmouth from 1985 to 2009. He was an active participant in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and was jailed in Selma, Alabama in 1965, on the eve of the famous Selma to Montgomery march.

Professor Bruce Nelson

Courtney Wong (CW): What prompted you to become involved in the Civil Rights Movement, a movement that preached some vastly different values than the ones you grew up with?

Public Program: Q&A with Professor Gretchen Gerzina, Dartmouth and the Civil Rights Movement Panelist

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the historic march from Montgomery to Selma, Alabama. For this year’s celebration of this momentous event, the Rockefeller Center explored Dartmouth’s connections to the Civil Rights Movement by hosting a faculty panel. After their talk, "We Were There…Dartmouth and the Civil Rights Movement," Courtney Wong '15 sat down with Gretchen Gerzina, a speaker on the panel, for an interview. This is the second interview in a series with each of the panelists.

The Kathe Tappe Vernon Professor in Biography, Professor of English, and Chair of African American Studies at Dartmouth College, Gretchen Gerzina is the author or editor of seven books and was for 15 years the host of the nationally syndicated public radio program "The Book Show." An Ann Arbor, Michigan native, Gerzina recently wrote a novel entitled "Mr. and Mrs. Prince: How an Extraordinary Eighteenth-Century Family Moved Out of Slavery and into Legend."
 

Public Program: Q&A with Special Collections Librarian Jay Satterfield, Dartmouth and the Civil Rights Movement Panelist

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the historic march from Montgomery to Selma, Alabama. For this year’s celebration of this momentous event, the Rockefeller Center explored Dartmouth’s connections to the Civil Rights Movement by hosting a faculty panel. After their talk, "We Were There…Dartmouth and the Civil Rights Movement," Courtney Wong '15 sat down with Jay Satterfield, a speaker on the panel, for an interview. This is the first interview in a series with each of the panelists.

Head of Dartmouth College’s Rauner Special Collections Library, Jay Satterfield has worked to integrate Special Collections into the intellectual life of the College since his arrival in 2004. He received his PhD in American Studies from the University of Iowa in 1999 and is the author of "The World’s Best Books: Taste, Culture and the Modern Library."

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The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences