The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Class of 2019

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Jovanay Carter '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Jovanay Carter, a member of the Class of 2019, has developed a project which highlights the experiences of black ballerinas in the United States from the mid-20th century to the contemporary era. Jovanay plans to emphasize a small part of the cultural experience of blacks in America to highlight key themes of class, race, gender, intersectionality, power dynamics, body politics, and the myth of the black superwoman.

Notes From the Field: Elise Burr '19

Elise Burr '19 interned at the Institute for the Study of War during the summer of 2018. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

I served as an Iraq research analyst intern at the Institute for the Study of War (ISW) during the summer of 2018. ISW is a non-partisan think-tank aimed at improving the nation’s ability to execute military operations and respond to emerging threats in order to achieve U.S. strategic objectives. ISW provides the public and U.S. decisionmakers timely intelligence on politics, terror threats, and military engagements in several Middle Eastern and Central Asian countries.

Notes From the Field: Christina Reagan '19

Christina Reagan '19 interned at JustLeadershipUSA, a non-profit advocacy organization fighting for criminal justice reform, during the 2018 Summer Term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This summer, I was a policy and advocacy intern at JustLeadershipUSA in New York City. JustLeadershipUSA is a non-profit advocacy organization fighting for criminal justice reform on a local, state, and national level. They are comprised of three different pillars—Membership, with the goal of enrolling all incarcerated people in the US as members; Leadership, with the goal of training formerly incarcerated people and lifting up their voices as leaders in the fight against mass incarceration; and lastly, Advocacy, which is made up of campaigns to change the policies that affect communities impacted by mass incarceration.

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Jennifer Wu '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Jennifer Wu, a member of the Class of 2019, is a Quantitative Social Science (QSS) major and a Government and Japanese minor.

Jennifer is interested in political psychology, public opinion, and political methodology and her QSS senior thesis looks at how people react to civil comments from a politician compared to uncivil comments, and how much of a difference it makes to the public if politicians apologize for their uncivil comments. Furthermore, it will look at whether in-group/out-group characteristics, specifically gender of respondent and politician, moderate how favorably people view a politician after an apology compared to no apology. Her advisor is Government Professor Yusaku Horiuchi, the Mitsui Professor of Japanese Studies.

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Genna Liu '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Genna Liu, a member of the Class of 2019, is a Quantitative Social Science and Economics major.

Genna is interested in using quantitative analysis to understand issues relating to immigration, trade, and policy. After becoming interested in survey methodology through the Government DSP, she is conducting a survey experiment using conjoint analysis and framing treatments to examine Americans' immigration policy preferences and how it is affected by immigration framing. Her advisor is Government Professor Yusaku Horiuchi, the Mitsui Professor of Japanese Studies.

In addition to her QSS thesis, Genna's research also includes examining the relationship between uncertainty, immigration, and geographic mobility.

In the future, Genna hopes to attend graduate school to study more quantitative research methods.

Notes From the Field: Casey Hunter '19

Casey Hunter '19 interned with the Military and Veterans Affairs Department for the New York City Office of U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand during the 2018 Summer Term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Evan Morgan '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Evan Morgan, a member of the Class of 2019, is a Quantitative Social Science major and History minor from San Clemente, California.

Using an online survey experiment, Evan seeks to determine the effect of stigmatizing language on drug policy preferences and perceptions of people who use drugs. This project continues his work studying the opioid overdose crisis. Evan previously did research at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy on the rise of opioid prescribing and is working on a project with Professor Brendan Nyhan to determine how localized drug conditions affect the behavior of legislators. As a Stamps Scholar, he runs a data journalism blog documenting the overdose crisis in New Hampshire. His advisor is Mia Costa, Assistant Professor in the Department of Government.

Outside the classroom, Evan works as an editor for The Dartmouth newspaper, plays cello in the symphony orchestra, and barely keeps pace with the triathlon team. He plans to pursue a career in data science.

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Teresa Alvarado-Patlan '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Teresa Alvarado-Patlan, a member of the Class of 2019, is a native of Zamora, Michoacan, Mexico who currently resides in the Suburbs of Chicago. She is a Latin American, Latino, & Caribbean Studies (LALACS) major and a French minor. Alvarado-Patlan is a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Associate Fellow and serves as a student member of the Committee on Standards in the Office of Judicial Affairs.

Her thesis focuses on the evolution of the Department of Homeland Security - from an agency enforcing strict immigration laws and border security to combating terrorism, to its current agenda targeting Latinx immigrants from the Northern Triangle countries of El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. Her advisor is Matt Garcia, Professor of History and Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies.

Shasti Conrad on Activism and Institutional Change

Shasti Conrad is a dynamic force, working to empower diverse and inclusive voices so that all people can be part of bettering our world. An inspiring speaker and activist in her own right, she also has an impressive background of working with three Nobel Peace Prize winners, President Barack, Malala Yousafzai, and Kailash Satyarthi. She now works as the U.S. campaign manager for the 100 Million Campaign, a youth mobilization effort to end child labor and trafficking.

 

She led the Fellows in a session entitled “Activism and Institutional Change.” She kicked off the session by sharing her philosophy on creating positive change that centers around “people-powered policymaking.” She encouraged the Fellows to emulate leaders engaged in problem-solving from an inclusive lens and to break down barriers so that others can get through them. She challenged the Fellows to not just recreate the same structures of power and inequality but to disrupt them. Shasti told us that Malala taught her, “your life is a gift –an opportunity to change the world for the better each day,” and that sentiment can motivate each of us to do good in the world.

 

Notes from the Field: Anabel Moreno-Mendez '19

Anabel Moreno-Mendez '19 interned for the Office of U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley in Washington, D.C. during the 2018 Spring Term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

I chose to complete my Senate internship with Senator Merkley because of his character, integrity, and dedication to my home state of Oregon. He was also a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and as a government major focusing in international relations, I knew that I wanted to get an inside look to how foreign policy was created on the domestic level.  As a part of my internship, I was assigned to various policy teams including the foreign relations, banking, judiciary, telecommunications, and press teams. I also assisted with constituent correspondence, front desk duty, tours, and a variety of tasks as requested.

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