The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors

Leadership with Others

The third session of D-LAB shifted the focus from reflecting on one’s own values to the values of our friends and peers, and if and how the people we spend the most time with influence our own values.   

Prior to the session, participants were asked to have a close friend  at Dartmouth select five values that they thought best described the participant . This led to a conversation of whether the values participants selected for themselves matched the ones their friend selected. Subsequently, the conversation diverged to talking about  the fact that context can play a role in this assessment.   For example, a teammate will likely select different values for the participant than a classmate. 

Our small groups then pondered the question: Do you share the same values as your friends? Each group discussed how friends impact our individual values and if there is a difference between high school and college friends. Many participants offered that college friends come from a variety of backgrounds, which makes their experience and viewpoints different from their own.      

Leadership From Within: Part II

The second session of D-LAB was also the second part of Leadership From Within, where participants focused on their individual values and how they influenced everyday actions, leadership roles, and future goals.

Beginning with an icebreaker that asked participants to name their role model and what values they associated the role model with, students discussed various figures in their lives, including family members, celebrities, government officials, and historical figures. Values mentioned included the more abstract, such as integrity and courage, rather than the more tangible, such as health, appearance, or aesthetic.

Prior to the session, participants had been asked to choose ten most prioritized values and their ten least prioritized values from a sheet of forty characteristics and following the icebreaker, the conversation moved to a discussion of these choices and why students picked certain values. It was noted that knowing the specific “color” of one’s personality was an influence on choosing values, as well as that choosing negative values was more difficult than choosing positive ones.

Leadership From Within: Part I

January 18th, 2016 marked the beginning of D-LAB, Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors, a six-week long program co-sponsored by the Rockefeller Center and the Collis Center for Student Involvement. David Pack and Robin Frye started the meeting by explaining how this program enables participants to reflect on individual values to increase self awareness. Another goal of the program is to identify one’s strengths and weaknesses and learn how they arise in a group setting. Student facilitator Austin Boral continued the discussion of D-LAB’s goals by introducing the concept of “breadth versus depth” and how it relates to leadership.  He noted how in high school most students possess a multitude of skills, but stated the importance in transitioning to possessing a few skills in areas one is most passionate about.  Over the course of the program, the first year student participants will have the opportunity to converse with their peers and upperclassmen about their experiences at Dartmouth, and discover the values most important to them.

D-LAB Session 5: Leadership in Practice

This ongoing series shares the experiences of participants and facilitators in D-LAB (Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors), a student-facilitated program designed for first-year students to discover the relationship between leadership and personal values.

D-LAB’s fifth and final session was titled "Leadership in Practice," and the goal of the evening was to help students identify programs and opportunities that would be their natural next steps in putting what they learned and experienced in the first four D-LAB sessions into action. Representatives from 18 different departments and centers, listed below, attended the session, and the format followed the World Café methodology of 15 minute rounds of small group conversations. There was enough time for participants to visit at least six areas of their choice.

 

 

D-LAB Session 4: Leadership for Others

This ongoing series shares the experiences of participants and facilitators in D-LAB (Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors), a student-facilitated program designed for first-year students to discover the relationship between leadership and personal values.

D-LAB’s fourth session, "Leadership for Others," opened with the group at large being asked to help recap of all the previous sessions. Participants were asked "what stuck" from prior weeks. Had they found themselves thinking about topics discussed during a previous session while going about their day? Many did, and by discussing past sessions participants were able to see the connections between personal values, the values of those one associates with, and leadership in different contexts. As a group, participants discussed what they took away from previous sessions and how they will apply what they have learned while moving forward in their Dartmouth careers.

 

 

D-LAB Session 3: Leadership with Others

This ongoing series shares the experiences of participants and facilitators in D-LAB (Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors), a student-facilitated program designed for first-year students to discover the relationship between leadership and personal values.

 

 

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