The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Faculty and Staff

Shaiko Opinion Piece About Diversity Published in Recent Chronicle of Higher Education

In his Chronicle of Higher Education opinion piece, Ronald Shaiko, senior fellow and the associate director for curricular and research programs at The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences, says that in order to create diverse campus communities, colleges and universities must do more than accept diverse classes of incoming students each year.

Read the full opinion piece online.

Professor Charles Wheelan '88's New Book, "The Centrist Manifesto"; Media Mentions

A senior lecturer and policy fellow here at the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences, Professor Charles Wheelan '88 has recently published a new book, called The Centrist Manifesto.

Professor Charles Wheelan's New Book, "Naked Statistics" is a Must-Read

Who said that learning statistics can't be fun? Certainly not public policy and economics professor Charles Wheelan '88, who recently published a book entitled, "Naked Statistics: Stripping the Dread from the Data".

Rocky caught up with Professor Wheelan to ask him why he decided to write the book. He explained, 

"I wrote the book for two reasons:

  1. Data and statistics really do matter than ever before. We now have cheap computing power and the ability to search data from anywhere, at any time. If you add those things up it creates a powerful result.
  2. I've had a lot of bad statistics courses, some even taught by famous people.  Learning about statistics doesn't have to be a complete dread. It also frustrated me that the math got in the way of intuition, which actually plays a large role in statistical analysis."

You can read the New York Times' review of Naked Statistics here.

RLF Recap: Rocky's Own Andrew Samwick Speaks to Students about the "Resource Curse"

Professor Samwick used the resource curse to teach us valuable lessons about leadership. His highly interactive session began with a discussion regarding the definition of the resource curse, the difficulty that resource-rich countries face relative to comparable resource-poor countries.  Professor Samwick then helped characterize the causes of the resource curse, breaking them into active and passive, making us realize how deeply ingrained this obstacle is. 

Perhaps the most interesting part of this session was taking the resource curse and applying it to non-state situations.  All kinds of suggestions were brought up for resources that can negatively affect individuals if not managed properly, from increasing information on the Internet to newfound popularity of a cappella groups.  After a rousing discussion, Professor Samwick brought the conversation back to leadership – not only is the resource curse caused by mismanaging resources, but as individuals, we can mismanage our own personal talents that make us the leaders we are.  This newfound awareness will serve as a powerful tool in our personal, academic, and professional lives. 

Staff Profile: Meet Andrea Allbee

Andrea Allbee - Financial Manager

What was your most rewarding collegiate experience as an undergraduate or graduate?
My most rewarding undergraduate experience was conducting a national survey on police psychologists and presenting my findings at an undergraduate research conference.

Why did you choose to work at Dartmouth College, and/or what do you currently most enjoy about your position and/or field of interest?

I enjoy working in an academic environment where learning is going on all around me, while at the same time being able to utilize my skills as an accountant.  I particularly enjoy working at the Rockefeller Center because there are so many opportunities to experience and learn new things.

What is your most important message to pass on to students?

Never stop learning.  I think Franklin Pierce Adams said it best, “I find that a great part of the information I have, was acquired by looking up something and finding something else on the way.”

Staff Profile: Andrew Samwick, Director of the Rockefeller Center

Andrew Samwick - Director of the Rockefeller Center

What was your most rewarding collegiate experience as an undergraduate or graduate?
My most rewarding collegiate experience was doing a summer research assistantship at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System after my second year of graduate school.  It was an opportunity to be immersed in a strong economic research environment, and it opened my eyes to the relevance of public policy and the many ways to put an economics Ph.D. to work.

Why did you choose to work at Dartmouth College, and/or what do you currently most enjoy about your position and/or field of interest?

Wheelan '88 Teaches Course in American Politics and Public Policy in Fall 2012

Students in PBPL 20: Contemporary Issues in American Politics and Public Policy this fall with Senior Lecturer and Policy Fellow Charles Wheelan ’88 will have visits from several notable guest speakers.  Coordinated with our fall public programs, the class will have visits from

Staff Profile: Timothy J. Ruback - Visiting Assistant Professor in Public Policy

"Read beyond your expertise.  Your most inspired ideas will come from the most unexpected places."

Staff Profile: Joanne Needham

"The reputation of the Rockefeller Center at Dartmouth as a place of learning and inspiration drew me to Dartmouth College"
Joanne Needham - Coordinator of Public and Special Events
What was your most rewarding collegiate experience as an undergraduate or graduate?
Actually there are two:

Learning the value of volunteering. Each semester starting as a freshman, we were encouraged to volunteer at one of the many agencies, organizations, or schools in the area surrounding the university. I started by volunteering at an after-school program, and have volunteered within my community ever since.

Staff Profile: Thanh Nguyen

"Working at Dartmouth College and at Rocky specifically was an easy choice for me – it allows me to channel my energy to help others in fulfilling their potential."

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