The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

First Year Fellow

Rocky and Me: Peter Charalambous '20 Senior Reflection

In the Rocky & Me series, Seniors reflect on their experiences during their time at Dartmouth.

After four years, I have reached the conclusion that Dartmouth College, and the Rockefeller Center in particular, are truly special places. While they’re special in more ways than one — historic, unique, and perhaps sentimental — what makes Dartmouth and Rocky special in my eyes is that they are one of the few places where nearly everything exists to support students. That’s a rare thing in the world as a whole, with most people out there to make it themselves with often little regard for others. At Dartmouth, though, everyone from the professors in your classes to the staff members you’ve never met before are united in the goal of student success. They want to see students grow and accomplish their goals, and they work towards that goal with unparalleled kindness and generosity.

Rocky and Me: Sunny Drescher '20 Senior Reflection

In the Rocky & Me series, Seniors reflect on their experiences during their time at Dartmouth.

While I will miss many things about Dartmouth upon graduation, I will undoubtedly miss the Rockefeller Center the most. I will miss the physical building, in which I have spent so much time over the years that several professors started referring to Hinman Forum as my “office.” I will miss the bustle of students coming in and out of classes and the opportunity to run into professors haphazardly. I will miss taking classes and learning more about how to effectively analyze various social and economic problems. I will miss the home base that the Rockefeller Center has provided me over my four years at Dartmouth, but I know that the friends, mentors, and memories I have made will continue to ground and support me in the years to come. 

Rocky and Me: Victoria Meyer '20 Senior Reflection

In the Rocky & Me series, Seniors reflect on their experiences during their time at Dartmouth.

My introduction to the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center is a bit peculiar, as I knew nothing of the center when I first arrived at Dartmouth. Dirt still clinging to my hair from rock climbing on First-Year Trips, I aimlessly wandering around the different booths at the Rocky info session, not realizing how large of an impact the center would have on my time at Dartmouth. 

Rocky and Me: Brandon Nye '20 Senior Reflection

In the Rocky & Me series, Seniors reflect on their experiences during their time at Dartmouth.

As a high school senior, perhaps the greatest single factor in my decision to attend Dartmouth was the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center. I was impressed with the emphasis on experiential learning and career preparation to go along with the numerous academic opportunities. Now as a senior in college, looking back on my time at Dartmouth, I find that some of the most fulfilling and transformative experiences were a result of the Rockefeller Center. 

Class of 2021 First-Year Fellow: Justin Kramer

As a First-Year Fellow, Justin Kramer ’21 interned at the National Disability Institute under the mentorship of Michael Morris P’08 & ’14. The following is an excerpt from his final report.

This summer, I got the opportunity to spend my summer working at the National Disability Institute (NDI). Despite its far-reaching name, NDI focuses on financial empowerment and wellness, economic self-sufficiency, and employment for people with disabilities in effort to mitigate the massive, crippling additional costs of having a disability. Having done more of the hands-on work with disability in the past at a disability baseball program, I was excited to look at disability through the lens of policy. My expectations were greatly exceeded.

Class of 2021 First-Year Fellow: Jolie Kemp

As a First-Year Fellow, Jolie Kemp ’21 interned at the Truman National Security Project under the mentorship of Michael Breen ’02. The following is an excerpt from her final report.

I interned at the Truman National Security Project, a nationwide membership of policy experts, veterans, and academics committed to addressing the national security concerns of today. Truman connects over 1,700 members across the country with 16 different chapters, each of which facilitates conversations around and develops concrete solutions to pressing security issues. The organization also aids its members by offering specific messaging and soundbites regarding current political events, trainings on topics from the military to op-ed writing, and an annual conference in D.C. that connects the entire community. Truman is currently working hard to shape the future of issues such as family separation and the Muslim immigration ban.

Class of 2021 First-Year Fellow: Zoe Schwartzman

As a First-Year Fellow, Zoe Schwartzman ’21 interned at the District of Columbia Superior Court under the mentorship of Judge John M. Mott ’81. The following is an excerpt from her final report.

This summer, I worked as a judicial intern at the District of Columbia Superior Court in the Chambers of the Honorable Judge John M. Mott. The DC Superior Court is the trial court for the general jurisdiction of DC and houses many judicial divisions, such as the Civil, Criminal, Domestic Violence, Family Court, Probate, and Tax Divisions. Judge Mott is currently assigned to a Civil II Calendar, on which he handles a variety of civil actions including personal and property torts, vehicle accidents, medical malpractice, and landlord tenant cases.

Class of 2021 First-Year Fellow: Wally Joe Cook

As a First-Year Fellow, Wally Joe Cook ’21 interned at Voice of America under the mentorship of John Lippman ’71. The following is an excerpt from his final report.

This summer, I interned at Voice of America (VOA). VOA provides unbiased news to developing nations with restricted media environments. The organization operates under the VOA Charter, which ensures its nonpartisan status as a “consistently reliable and authoritative source of news.” Voice of America is constantly expanding to reach new marginalized populations and currently broadcasts in 45 languages.

As an intern at Voice of America, I had three main responsibilities. First, I rewrote the fact sheets for the sixteen most strategically important language services.  The fact sheets offer a glimpse into the operations of different language services and are seen by members of Congress and the executive branch.  Additionally, my edits were specifically intended to introduce the next CEO of the Board of Broadcasting Governors to VOA’s language services.  It is expected that President Trump will appoint a new CEO in the near future.

Class of 2021 First-Year Fellow: Valerie Truong

As a First-Year Fellow, Valerie Truong ’21 interned at the Smithsonian Institution under the mentorship of Edward Rynne ’77. The following is an excerpt from her final report.

This summer, I interned at the Smithsonian Organization and Audience Research (SOAR), a central office at the Smithsonian Institution that works with its clients to conduct organization and audience research and analysis. SOAR promotes organizational effectiveness within the Smithsonian and works to improve visitor experiences through relevant social science research approaches.

Class of 2021 First-Year Fellow: Stevie Karol

As a First-Year Fellow, Stevie Karol ’21 interned at the World Resources Institute under the mentorship of Sofia Faruqi ’07. The following is an excerpt from his final report.

This summer, I interned at the the World Resources Institute (WRI). WRI is a research organization that empowers governments, private and public companies, and small businesses to incorporate sustainability practices in their business models. Through various initiatives and programs, WRI focuses on its core sectors of climate, energy, food, forests, water, cities, and ocean to further its global mission.

Pages

Close
The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences