The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Internships

Notes from the Field: Celeste Kearney '19

Celeste Kearney ’19 interned in the Office of Presidential Personnel at White House under the Obama Administration for the 2016 Fall term. She received support from the from the Peter McSpadden Public Affairs Fund.  The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

During the fall of 2016, I was an intern in the Office of Presidential Personnel at the White House. Presidential Personnel is tasked with the approximately 4,000 political appointees in the Obama Administration. Presidential Personnel finds qualified candidates, completes background checks, appoints candidates, and, for the past year, provides a series of leadership development events to assist the appointees’ transition from the Administration. Presidential Personnel works closely with the White House liaisons in every federal agency to pass opportunities and information to the appointees.             

Notes from the Field: Rachel Scholz-Bright ‘18

Rachel Scholz-Bright ‘18 interned in the Civil Rights Division of the Massachusetts Attorney General's Office for the 2017 winter term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report. ​

Notes from the Field: Oliver Engelhart ’18

Oliver Engelhart ’18 interned in the Office of Senator Gillibrand from New York for the 2017 winter term with support from the Perkins Bass '34 Fund. The following is an excerpt from his internship report. ​

This past winter I had the opportunity to intern in the Office of Senator Gillibrand from New York. I took everything I hoped to take away from this experience. I gained an insight into domestic politics, worked on legislative issues I was passionate about, and developed relationships with staffers, alums, and friends in the capitol. While I have primarily focused m studies at Dartmouth on international politics and Asian studies, working as an intern in the Senate was my chance to learn about American politics, and explore a part of the United States I have never been exposed to. The past few months have been a chaotic time in DC, given the inauguration and tension in the capitol, but I definitely think this was the opportune moment to experience the senate in full swing. During my time in the office I attended many of the Presidential Cabinet Nominee hearings, summarized briefings, and worked on research projects for staffers.

Notes from the Field: Julia Decerega '18

Julia Decerega '18 interned at the Brazil Institute within the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars for the 2017 winter term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

The Annual Student and Alumni Reception in Washington, D.C.

The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center hosted its annual Student and Alumni Reception in Washington, D.C. on Thursday, June 15, 2017. Each year the occasion provides an opportunity for the Center’s First-Year Fellows, newly arrived to the city and ready to embark on their 8-week summer internships, to meet and network with their Dartmouth Alumni mentors.

“The First-Year Fellows program is a great example of the partnership between the Rockefeller Center and Dartmouth alumni, who find many ways to contribute to the education of each successive cohort of Dartmouth students,” noted the Center’s Director, Professor Andrew Samwick, during his brief remarks at the reception.

This summer, 23 First-Year Fellows, all members of the Dartmouth Class of 2020, are serving fellowships in a diverse range of host organizations with a Dartmouth alumni mentor.

Notes from the Field: Danny Li '19

Danny Li '19 interned at the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training for the 2017 winter term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

Notes from the Field: Daniel Shlien '18

Daniel Shlien '18 interned at the Office of Economic Policy in the U.S. Treasury Department​ for the 2017 winter term with the support of Mr. E. John Rosenwald Jr. '52 Public Affairs Fund. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

This winter I had the opportunity to intern within the Office of Economic Policy in the U.S. Treasury Department, which is an office consisting of about twenty-five PhD economists and a handful of other staff who perform research a wide range of economic issues and advise the Secretary of the Treasury on those issues. During my internship, I was one of four interns who assisted economists in their research by cleaning up datasets, performing analyses, creating models, producing graphs and other visuals, and writing memos on our findings. One of the best parts about working in the Economic Policy office is its size –there are no research assistants and each economist is usually the only expert in their field in the office. Therefore, I worked directly with leading economists, people whose opinions on a subject, whether it be housing or healthcare, move the needle in the world of policy.

Notes from the Field: Cheron Laughing '19

Cheron Laughing '19 received the support of the Class of 1964 Fund to intern at the Navajo Nation Washington Office (NNWO) for the 2017 winter term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This winter I interned in the Navajo Nation Washington Office (NNWO) which was founded in 1984 to more actively safeguard this unique relationship and pursue the fulfillment of all responsibilities of the historic Treaty of 1868. It serves as a direct advocate of the Navajo Nation, a tribal government entity, with Congress, the White House and federal agencies. Specifically, the NNWO monitors and analyzes congressional legislation, all the while discerning best strategies and practices concerning national policies and budgets that affect all 300,000 enrolled members of the Navajo Nation.

Notes from the Field: Robert He '19

Robert He '19 was funded by the Class of 1964 to intern at the Office of Public Engagement at the White House during the 2016 fall term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

In the fall of 2016, I had the immense privilege of serving as an intern in the Obama Administration at the White House. I served in the Office of Public Engagement, and helped to fulfill the President’s goal of making the White House as open and participatory as possible. In my role, I helped the White House engage with various organizations and stakeholders to further the Administration’s objectives.           

Notes from the Field: Noah Goldstein '18

Noah Goldstein '18 interned at the U.S. Department of Commerce during the 2016 Fall Term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report

During the fall of 2016 I worked for the U.S. Department of Commerce – Trade Administration & Commercial Services in the U.S. Embassy at London as an international trade assistant. The organization is the trade branch of the government and, as this one was based in the UK, was responsible for encouraging U.S. exports to the UK. Through the Obama administration’s SelectUSA policy, the organization also has the added responsibility of encouraging FDI, or foreign direct investment, from the UK going into the US. Thus, any UK companies looking to set up an office in the U.S. can go to Commercial Services to receive support. Commercial Services acts as a middle man between interested US companies and actors in the markets in the UK, often coordinating meetings between the two. For example, firms trying to sell a product in the UK are often able to get in a room of around 30 potential clients/distributors and pitch their product, thanks to the efforts of my office.

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