The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

PBPL 85: Global Policy Leadership

PBPL 85: Global Policy Leadership Travels to Northern Ireland

This post is part of a series on the Global Policy Leadership Practicum through PBPL 85. Students reflect on their experiences as part the travel abroad portion of the course to Northern Ireland during the winter break.

Public Policy 85, Global Policy Leadership Practicum, is a course that combines experiential learning and public policy, creating a unique and interactive learning environment for students. The course serves as a tool for connecting a select group of Dartmouth students to real-world international policy experience. Twelve rising juniors and seniors who have demonstrated keen interest in public policy while at Dartmouth are selected each year for participation in the course. Taught by renowned Senior Lecturer and Policy Fellow, Charles Wheelan '88, each year the course addresses a different international public policy debate. The unique aspect of the course is that it takes learning beyond the classroom and textbook by traveling to the country of study during winter break.

 

 

PBPL 85: Global Policy Leadership, "Economic Reform in India," Has Released Its Final Report

To read the entire PBPL 85 report regarding economic reform in India on SlideShare, please click here.

The students in Public Policy 85, the inaugural Practicum in Global Policy Leadership, have delivered their final report with prescriptions for economic reform in India. The memo lays out a series of highly detailed recommendations ranging from introducing a national Goods and Services Tax (GST) to making significant new investments in education and infrastructure. The memo was written collaboratively by the 12 students participating in the course as a hypothetical “white paper” that could serve as an economic blueprint for the next Indian government. (There will be national elections in 2014.)

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The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences