The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Profile

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Elijah Soko '16

This series introduces the 2015-2016 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

Recently I have being thinking a lot about leadership and love. What does it mean to lead with love? After my father passed away when I was in the seventh grade, my mother became the sole head of the household. My mother is very gentle, fun-loving, soft-spoken, open, humorous. My nickname for her is baby-face. This woman fostered my growth academically, physically and spiritually. All this without explicitly challenging me to work harder, raucously cheering me on the soccer field, or forcing her faith on me. It is possible to lead with love. It is the most efficient way to affect a person’s whole being. From the very beginning my mother made it clear that one of the main reasons she had the strength to carry on, without dad, was simply to provide and care for my sister and me. This drove me to do the very best I could, simply because I knew I was loved.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Corey Stock '16

This series introduces the 2015-2016 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.  

I study mathematics at Dartmouth, and thus have strong quantitative skills and love to use these skills in data analysis and statistics. I am also passionate about healthcare and improving the healthcare system within the US. I know that the US has strong leaders in healthcare as well as strong leaders in applied mathematics and statistical analysis, yet I believe that there is a big gap in combining these two fields to improve the US healthcare system on a local and national basis. This fusion is possible by statistically analyzing health care methods both domestically and internationally.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Anne Smith ’16

This series introduces the 2015-2016 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

I became interested in the RLF Program because I think it is important to dedicate weekly time to improving your personal abilities and meeting new people. Most Dartmouth students are extremely busy juggling their schoolwork, extracurricular activities, and social life. Our term schedule makes it easy for students to get consumed in their work and forget the larger picture of life. The RLF Program offers a two-hour span every week to forget about the stresses of Dartmouth life and instead focus on being a good leader and citizen in the future.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Andrew Zhu ’16

This series introduces the 2015-2016 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

One of my toughest experiences at Dartmouth happened during the spring of my freshman year while playing rugby. I endured a season-ending concussion that lasted 2 months. I had just spent the entire year training and competing for a spot on the first team, and with one untimely hit, my season was over. I didn’t feel like myself, I was behind with my academics, and worst of all, I felt like I couldn’t contribute to the rugby team. I wanted to lead and be on the field.

Recognizing Rockefeller Center Intern Ali Kelkawi

Student employees at the Rockefeller Center come from all kinds of backgrounds, but there is perhaps no background more unique than that of Ali Kelkawi, a 19-year-old rising junior at the American University of Kuwait (AUK) who is finishing up a four week internship at Dartmouth. 

Ali explains that Dartmouth College and the University of Kuwait have an exchange program that sends two to three interns to Hanover for a month each summer to participate in different types of campus programs.  He explains that it has been an enduring program, as his two supervisors are alumni of the same internship.  Ali says that he first decided to apply because,  "when I heard the opportunity for a month-long internship in the US, I thought why not?  It's the best way to spend the summer."

Recognizing Rockefeller Center Student Program Assistant Lily Morrison ‘16

In this series, the Rockefeller Center features our Student Program Assistants, student staff who contribute significantly to the success of the Center’s events, programs, and activities.

Most of the Student Assistants at the Rockefeller Center are assigned to work on specific programs, but some students assist with day-to-day operations and unique projects. Lily Morrison ’16, for example, lends her efforts on special projects, whether that may entail creating a presentation, coordinating a seminar, or researching for a potential speaker.

Recognizing Rockefeller Center Student Program Assistant Alisa White ’17

In this series, the Rockefeller Center features our Student Program Assistants, student staff who contribute significantly to the success of the Center’s events, programs, and activities.

Dartmouth can sometimes be a daunting place, but there are so many resources at the Rockefeller Center that are aimed to help students achieve their academic and professional goals. Among these resources are the Rockefeller Center’s peer mentoring programs, which help provide students with an extensive network of alumni and opportunities in the world of leadership and public policy both on and off campus. After participating in the Rockefeller Peer Mentoring Program (RPMP) herself, Alisa White ’17 is now one of the Student Program Assistants that is helping to reshape the program.

 

First-Year Fellow Mentor: Lisa-Joy Zgorski

The First-Year Fellows program is a unique opportunity for first-year students to engage meaningfully in public policy early in their Dartmouth careers. Each year, around 20 students are selected and placed in fellowships with Dartmouth alumni in Washington, D.C., who are willing to take on a significant mentoring role.
 
“'Who works in an organization which might benefit from the contributions of a young, intellectually curious, smart, talented, ambitious Dartmouth student?' I do. As an added personal bonus, my intern last year, Karna Adam '16, probably without even realizing he was doing it, reminded me of why I chose public service and why I must remain committed to and enthusiastic about making an impact.” --Lisa-Joy Zgorski

Recognizing Rockefeller Center Student Program Assistant Abigail Chen '17

In this series, the Rockefeller Center features our Student Program Assistants, student staff who contribute significantly to the success of the Center’s events, programs, and activities.

As an intended major in Computer Science, Abigail Chen '17 did not expect to be involved with the Rockefeller Center in the way she is now. Abigail started working at the Center last term as a Student Photographer, a position that sees her attending the many public programs, lectures, workshops and student discussion panels to capture pictures of the different events. Photography is a long time hobby of Abigail’s, and she is glad to be able to pursue this hobby at Dartmouth. She explains "Photography is something that I really enjoy and being able to apply it in a way that is useful for a lot of people is really gratifying for me."

Rocky and Me: Mahnum Shahzad '15 Senior Profile

The Rockefeller Center encourages its outgoing seniors to reflect on their experiences at Dartmouth as part of a series called Rocky and Me.

I had very grandiose notions about leadership and growth when I came to college. College applications had me convinced that I was destined to change the world. Of course I had no clue what any of it meant or how I would eventually get there.

Mahnum Shahzad '15. Photo by Philip Son '16.

Perhaps that is why I decided to participate in the Management Leadership Development Program (MLDP). The experience taught me about the constant process of developing leadership skills and how leadership is a vision as much as the skills that one needs to become an effective leader. It redefined leadership for me as something less hierarchical and situation-driven to something that one could practice personally.

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