The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Profile

Class of 2019 First-Year Fellow: Grant McArtor

Grant McArtor ’19 is from Boiling Springs, South Carolina and graduated high school at the McCallie School in Chattanooga, Tennessee. In high school, Grant was a member the National Honor Society and the Cum Laude Society and lettered in varsity rowing. Additionally, Grant was a National Merit Finalist and an AP Scholar with Distinction.

As a student at Dartmouth, Grant intends to major in Economics and minor in Government.

For his First-Year Fellowship, Grant was placed with Jenny Chandler ’82 at the National Council of Nonprofits, which works with federal, state, and local governments to ensure that the needs of nonprofits are being adequately met in public policy. 

“I think my favorite part of the fellowship and the internship specifically was the knowledge that I had at the end of my internship contributed positively to the mission of my organization,” says Grant. “Whether it was through the articles I worked on or the plethora of ‘little things’ I did to help out, I was pleasantly surprised that I could make an impact, even though I had virtually no previous experience in this field of work.”

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Carter Sullivan ’17

This series introduces the 2016-2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

While at Dartmouth, I have come to realize that there are multiple styles of leadership and that my methods can be just as effective as someone else’s if I use them correctly. I am most interested in a leader’s ability to get people to “buy in” to their ideas. It is always extremely impressive to observe a leader who can come up with an idea, present it effectively, and gain the support of the team who also believes in the idea. When a leader can accomplish this, projects are more sustainable as the people involved do not need to be constantly pressured to execute because in believing in the idea, they put the pressure on themselves. Not only is this ability a powerful leadership tool, it is also an extremely important tool for affecting change.

Class of 2019 FirstvYear Fellow: Alex Magnuson

Alex Magnuson ’19 grew up in Columbus, Ohio and graduated from Columbus Academy. At Dartmouth, Alex is pursuing a major in Economics with a minor in Geography. He is a member of the Dartmouth Figure Skating and Parliamentary Debate teams, teaches P.E. skating classes to undergraduates, and previously volunteered for the Dartmouth for Hillary Campaign.

For his First Year Fellowship, Alex worked as a research assistant at the Brookings Institution. This took many forms and varied between the qualitative and the quantitative.

He helped provide background research on global events like Brexit, wrote reports on committee hearings, summarized new academic papers, and travelled to different federal agencies to collect information in order to create datasets and construct instruments for ensuring exogenous variation in economic models. 

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Mary Sieredzinski ’17

This series introduces the 2016-2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

Leadership is a learning process. The Rockefeller Leadership Fellows program allows me to participate in a dialogue with other students who are as passionate about leadership as I am.

Mobilization, motivation, and mentorship are three of leadership’s most interesting aspects.

Class of 2019 First-Year Fellow: Sander Kushen

Alexander (Sander) Kushen ’19 comes from Orange County, California and graduated from Tesoro High School as a member of the National Honor Society and the California Scholarship Federation. Sander was honored as his high school’s male athlete of the year, along with a perpetual award named after him (the Kushen award), which is given to a Cross Country athlete for strong academic and athletic performance.

Although his major at Dartmouth is currently undecided, Sander is interested in the study of public policy.

As a First-Year Fellow, Sander interned in the Office of Representative Ann McLane Kuster ’78.  Besides the routine administrative tasks normally assigned to interns, Sander was able to help the office staffers by attending briefings, hearings, and other informational meetings and taking notes for them. He also wrote congratulatory letters to constituents, did research for the legislative assistants, and wrote press releases.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Deep Singh '17

This series introduces the 2016-2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

I believe that my participation in RLF will help improve some of my underdeveloped leadership qualities and equip me with the tools necessary for effective management.

Class of 2019 First-Year Fellow: Maxwell Kanefield

Maxwell Kanefield ’19 was born and raised in Washington, DC, which sparked his interest in the political world. Prior to Dartmouth, he worked with Operation Understanding DC, an organization that brings together African-American and Jewish students committed to eradicating racism and discrimination. He also founded a political discussion club at his high school. Maxwell received the U.S. Presidential Scholar award.

During his First-Year Fellow summer, Maxwell worked at the National Science Foundation in the Office of Legislative and Public Affairs. The Office’s main mission is to develop new scientists and strengthen the existing community, a mission that connected well with his passion and was, thus, very rewarding.

During his internship, Maxwell had a wide variety of roles and responsibilities, but his central project was a large-scale data collection and analysis conducted on Nobel Laureates funded by the NSF, compiled at the request of the Department of State.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Morgan Sandhu ’17

This series introduces the 2016-2017 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

The RLF program functions dually as a capstone for my experience with leadership at Dartmouth while also helping to ensure that I am being an effective leader during my senior year. Learning how to adapt my leadership style and push myself beyond my leadership comfort zone is the next step in my leadership journey. I view RLF as the only campus leadership program that can provide this final stage for growth.

At Dartmouth, my most meaningful long term commitments have been Mock Trial, the Policy Research Shop, and my sorority, Chi Delta. I have also completed several programs to help me lead effectively, including Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors Program, Civic Skills Training, and the Management and Leadership Development Program.

Dartmouth-Oxford Exchange Student: David Tramonte ’18

Through the Dartmouth-Oxford Exchange Program, up to four Dartmouth undergraduates can attend University of Oxford’s Keble College each term. As a fully integrated member of the Oxford community, students take courses in the British tutorial system that can count towards their major. David Tramonte ’18, a Government major and Public Policy minor, participated in this program in the fall of 2016.

David has been involved with the Rockefeller Center as a First-Year Fellow and as both a participant and Student Program Assistant for the Management and Leadership Development Program. This is where he first became aware of the Dartmouth-Oxford Exchange Program. It specifically interested him because of the dynamic history and scholarly atmosphere Oxford affords its students. The exchange provided David his first study abroad experience.

Class of 2019 First-Year Fellow: Io Jones

Maitland Lilja Io Jones ’19 grew up in Brooklyn, New York, and is studying Geography, Government, and Public Policy at Dartmouth College.

This past summer Io worked in the Office of Senator Kirsten Gillibrand '88 as an intern in the legislative office, where the work focused on both constituent services and legislative policy projects.

A long-term project she worked on involved going through a 420 page GMO Report published by the National Academy of Sciences, looking for how conflicts of interest may have affected how data is presented. Io also did research on two additionally interesting but unrelated topics: the possible health concerns associated with genetically engineered food and policing and the Black Lives Matter movement.

“I really enjoyed the range of assignments I got to work on and the balance between legislative work and interacting with New York constituents.”

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The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences