The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Q&A

Public Program: Q&A with Dr. W. Chris King, Veterans Day Program Lecturer

This year’s Veterans Day Program Lecture featured Dr. W. Chris King, Dean at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Before his talk, "International Environmental Security: What in the World is Worth Fighting For?," Courtney Wong ’15 sat down with Dr. King for an interview.

Dr. W. Chris King serves as the Chief Academic Officer of the US Army’s Command and General Staff. He earned his Ph.D. in environmental engineering at the University of Tennessee, published more than 30 journal articles and scientific reports as well as two books, and lectured at more than 50 professional conferences. He is a founding member of the Global Military Advisory Council on Climate Change. Dr. King retired from active duty after 34 years of commissioned service at the rank of Brigadier General.

Public Program: Q&A with Professor Bruce Nelson, Dartmouth and the Civil Rights Movement Panelist

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the historic march from Montgomery to Selma, Alabama. For this year’s celebration of this momentous event, the Rockefeller Center explored Dartmouth’s connections to the Civil Rights Movement by hosting a faculty panel. After their talk, "We Were There…Dartmouth and the Civil Rights Movement," Courtney Wong '15 sat down with Bruce Nelson, a speaker on the panel, for an interview. This is the last interview in a series with each of the panelists.

J. Bruce Nelson taught US history at Dartmouth from 1985 to 2009. He was an active participant in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and was jailed in Selma, Alabama in 1965, on the eve of the famous Selma to Montgomery march.

Professor Bruce Nelson

Courtney Wong (CW): What prompted you to become involved in the Civil Rights Movement, a movement that preached some vastly different values than the ones you grew up with?

Public Program: Q&A with Professor Gretchen Gerzina, Dartmouth and the Civil Rights Movement Panelist

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the historic march from Montgomery to Selma, Alabama. For this year’s celebration of this momentous event, the Rockefeller Center explored Dartmouth’s connections to the Civil Rights Movement by hosting a faculty panel. After their talk, "We Were There…Dartmouth and the Civil Rights Movement," Courtney Wong '15 sat down with Gretchen Gerzina, a speaker on the panel, for an interview. This is the second interview in a series with each of the panelists.

The Kathe Tappe Vernon Professor in Biography, Professor of English, and Chair of African American Studies at Dartmouth College, Gretchen Gerzina is the author or editor of seven books and was for 15 years the host of the nationally syndicated public radio program "The Book Show." An Ann Arbor, Michigan native, Gerzina recently wrote a novel entitled "Mr. and Mrs. Prince: How an Extraordinary Eighteenth-Century Family Moved Out of Slavery and into Legend."
 

Public Program: Q&A with Special Collections Librarian Jay Satterfield, Dartmouth and the Civil Rights Movement Panelist

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the historic march from Montgomery to Selma, Alabama. For this year’s celebration of this momentous event, the Rockefeller Center explored Dartmouth’s connections to the Civil Rights Movement by hosting a faculty panel. After their talk, "We Were There…Dartmouth and the Civil Rights Movement," Courtney Wong '15 sat down with Jay Satterfield, a speaker on the panel, for an interview. This is the first interview in a series with each of the panelists.

Head of Dartmouth College’s Rauner Special Collections Library, Jay Satterfield has worked to integrate Special Collections into the intellectual life of the College since his arrival in 2004. He received his PhD in American Studies from the University of Iowa in 1999 and is the author of "The World’s Best Books: Taste, Culture and the Modern Library."

Public Program: Q&A with this year's Roger S. Aaron '64 Lecturer, Mark Tushnet

The William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, Mark Tushnet is one of the leading theorists on constitutional law. He is the co-author of four casebooks and has written numerous books, including a two-volume work on the life of Justice Thurgood Marshall and, most recently, "Advanced Introduction to Comparative Constitutional Law," "In the Balance: The Roberts Court and the Future of Constitutional Law," "Why the Constitution Matters," and "Weak Courts, Strong Rights: Judicial Review and Social Welfare Rights in Comparative Perspective." He was President of the Association of American Law Schools in 2003. In 2002, he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Before his talk this month for The Roger S. Aaron '64 Lecture entitled “Constitutional Review and a General ‘Right to Liberty’,” Courtney Wong ’15 sat down with Mark Tushnet for an interview.

 

 

John Broderick Named Perkins Bass Distinguished Visitor

The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences has announced John T. Broderick, a former Chief Justice of the New Hampshire Supreme Court and the first Warren B. Rudman chairman at UNH Law, as the Perkins Bass Distinguished Visitor for 2014-2015. 

A former Chief Justice of the New Hampshire Supreme Court and the first Warren B. Rudman chairman at UNH Law, John T. Broderick has dedicated almost his entire life to public service. He served on the New Hampshire Supreme Court for 15 years and was also appointed by President Bill Clinton to the Board of the Legal Services Corporation (LSC), on which he served for 10 years. Broderick is the recipient of several honorary degrees, is a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, and recently received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the New Hampshire Business & Industry Association. He was President of the New Hampshire Bar Association from 1990 to 1991 and also served as a litigation attorney.

2014 Constitution Day: Q&A with Professor Jennifer Sargent

For this year’s Constitution Day, the Rockefeller Center featured Jennifer Sargent, a Visiting Associate Professor of Writing at Dartmouth College. In her lecture, Professor Sargent discussed the scope of the Fourth Amendment’s privacy law as it applies to digital technology and information.

In addition to being a part of the Dartmouth faculty, Professor Sargent is also a faculty member at the National Judicial College in Reno, Nevada. Professor Sargent served as a District Court Judge in New Hampshire for eight years before she resigned from the bench to serve as Chief Disciplinary Counsel for the New Hampshire Supreme Court Attorney Discipline Office.

Speaking with Chetna Sinha about Financial Inclusion and Women Empowerment

An economist, farmer, and activist, Chetna Sinha works for social change in some of the poorest and most drought-stricken areas of rural India. She is the founder and president of the Mann Deshi Mahila Bank, a micro-enterprise development bank that serves more than 185,000 low-income women. She was named Social Entrepreneur of the Year 2013 for India by Palaniappan Chidambaram, Finance Minister of India and has been honored with the 2005 Jankidevi Bajaj Puraskar award for rural entrepreneurship. She has also been awarded lifetime membership with Ashoka Innovators for the Public, and was selected for the first class of Yale University's World Fellows program in 2002-2003.

Before her talk, “Financial Inclusion and Women Empowerment,” Courtney Wong ’15 sat down with Chetna Sinha for an interview.

Discussing Income Inequality with Greg Mankiw and Jared Bernstein

Greg Mankiw is a professor of economics at Harvard University, a New York Times columnist, and former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President George W. Bush. A former graduate of Princeton University and MIT, he has taught macroeconomics, microeconomics, statistics, and principles of economics. You may recognize him as the author of your textbooks. In addition to teaching, his research includes work on price adjustment, consumer behavior, financial markets, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth. His published articles have appeared in academic journals, such as the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics.

The War on Terror - Q&A with Georgetown Law Professor David Cole

David Cole, the Hon. George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law, has been published widely in law journals and the popular press, authoring or co-authoring several award-winning books on the topics of constitutional law, national security, and criminal justice. He has worked as a staff attorney for the Center for Constitutional Rights from 1985-90, and has continued to litigate as a professor. He has litigated many significant constitutional cases in the Supreme Court, including Texas v. Johnson, and has been involved in many of the nation’s most important cases involving civil liberties and national security. David has received two honorary degrees and numerous awards for his human rights work, including the inaugural 2013 Norman Dorsen Presidential Prize from the ACLU for lifetime commitment to civil liberties.

Before presenting his talk, “Can President Obama End the War on Terror?”, Courtney Wong ’15 sat down with David Cole for a brief interview.

CW: Where is the future of the war on terror headed?

Pages

Close
The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences