The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Q&A

Q&A with Political Philosophy Professor Will Kymlicka

 
Professor Will Kymlicka is the Chair in Political Philosophy at Queen’s University and focuses his studies on multicultural citizenship. He questions whether animals are the type of being with whom humans can establish fair terms of cooperating citizenship. His most recent book, co-authored with Sue Donaldson, is Zoopolis: A Political Theory of Animal Rights (2011).   Before presenting his public lecture on Animals and the Frontiers of Citizenship, Courtney Wong '15 sat down with Will Kymlicka for a brief interview.

Courtney Wong (CW): What made you interested in political philosophy in the first place?

Q & A with Former NH Senator Judd Gregg

 

Former Senator Judd Gregg is serving as Dartmouth's first Distinguished Fellow and  will be teaching, lecturing, and counseling Dartmouth graduate and undergraduate students. Having served as senator for three terms and serving the state of New Hampshire as Governor from 1989 to 1993, Senator Gregg will remain at Dartmouth for three years to engage with students interested in government and public policy. Before presenting his public lecture on Federal Budgeting in a Post-Cliff Environment, Courtney Wong '15 sat down with Senator Gregg for a brief interview. 

Courtney Wong (CW): You've been a guest at Dartmouth many time before -- giving public lectures, speaking to classes, hosting discussion lunches -- what keeps drawing you back to campus? 

Q&A with Professor Jennifer Taub of Vermont Law School

Jennifer Taub, professor of business law at Vermont Law School, visited Dartmouth last week to discuss the Dodd-Frank Act that may or may not prevent another large-scale financial crisis. As a researcher and writer in the areas of financial reform, corporate governance, and mutual fund regulation, Taub has the expertise necessary to analyze if the financial system is still risky after all these years. Before kicking off her lecture on "The U.S. Financial System: Still Risky after All These Years," Andres Ramirez '14 sat down with Jennifer Taub to delve deeper into her life and opinions.

Andres Ramirez: What aspect of law drives to practice and teach? What drew you into law in the first place?

"The vote is not just a right, but an obligation." Q & A with @UNH Law Professor John Greabe '85

John Greabe ‘85, Professor of Law at UNH and Appellate Attorney, came to Dartmouth this week to discuss the New Hampshire Voter Identification Law recently approved by the Department of Justice. Greabe has nearly seventeen years of experience clerking for federal appeals and trial court judges for the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. He now teaches courses on Constitutional Law and Civil Procedure at the University of New Hampshire. Before his lecture entitled “How the Voting Law Affects You?,”  Bridget Golob ’14 sat down with John Greabe to talk more about his experiences with Dartmouth, his contributions to the fields of law and academia, and his perspective on the new voter identification law in New Hampshire.

The Impact of Joe Biden on This Women's Rights Advocate: Q&A with Professor Victoria Nourse

Victoria Nourse, Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Congressional Studies at Georgetown University Law Center, came to Dartmouth last week to discuss the 1994 Violence Against Women Act and the resurfacing of women's equality issues in the so-called "war on women." Having served as an appellate lawyer for the Department of Justice and as senior advisor to now-Vice President Biden on legislative matters, Nourse addressed the issue of under-representation of women in Congress. Before commencing her lecture on The Lost History of Legislation on Women and Violence, Andres Ramirez '14 sat down with Victoria Nourse to delve deeper into her life and aspirations.

Andres Ramirez (AR): What drew you into law? What is your recommendation for those who are currently pursuing this career path? 

From Country Lawyer to US Senator: Q&A with Senator Judd Gregg

"I really enjoy this campus. I am looking forward to interact with students on a personal level, counseling students with issues and being available to give life experience."

  
Former Senator Judd Gregg will serve as Dartmouth’s first Distinguished Fellow; teaching, lecturing, and counseling Dartmouth graduate and undergraduate students. Having served as senator for three terms and serving the state of New Hampshire as Governor from 1989 to 1993, Senator Gregg will remain at Dartmouth for three years to engage with students interested in government and public policy. Before discussing the role of the Senate as part of Constitution Day, Andres Ramirez ’14 sat down with Senator Gregg for a brief interview. 

Andres Ramirez (AR): How was your experience as both a governor and senator? Did you like one over the other?

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