The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Recap

4 Keys to Creating the Ultimate Presentation Deck

As part of MLDP, we encourage students to take advantage of the Rockefeller Center's bonus content, which can be found on our Pinterest page by clicking here. We hope students can use the bonus content as a way of learning about real-life examples that draw on the material we teach in the program. For more information about MLDP, click here

Marisa Wong’s 4 Keys to Creating the Ultimate Presentation Deck provides a simple yet eloquent review of the necessities of any good presentation. Although they seem quite obvious when one casually reads the four simple components of a good powerpoint, too many presentations are still, in Wong’s words, “boring, long-winded and just plain painful to look at.” Since nobody enjoys being the speaker boring audiences, it is not surprising that articles and tip guides such as Marisa Wong’s are still commonly used resources by inexperienced presenters. 

MLDP Recap: Approaching Other Cultures with an Open Mind

I’m scheduled to board a plane to Paris to study abroad in less than a month. Since I will be spending ten weeks living with a host family, navigating French life and improving my language fluency, it is important for me to learn about how to approach these situations effectively. During this MLDP session, titled Developing a Global Mindset, Christianne Hardy Wohlforth emphasized how to develop an awareness of intercultural differences and how to operate effectively in different cultural contexts. In order to do so, it’s important to distinguish between understanding cultural differences and incorporating sensitivity to these differences into our behavior.

"How to Identify and Learn from Your Mistakes"

As part of MLDP, we encourage students to take advantage of the Rockefeller Center's bonus content, which can be found on our Pinterest page by clicking here. We hope students can use the bonus content as a way of learning about real-life examples that draw on the material we teach in the program. For more information about MLDP, click here.

There’s a psychological study that tells us that people who are perfect are not as well liked as people who are flawed. As humans, while we may all strive and yearn for perfection, we are inevitably doomed to fail and make mistakes, even stupid mistakes that we wish to, but cannot, avoid. But making mistakes isn’t as terrifying as it sounds and is the source of human growth.

D-LAB Recap: Freshmen Discuss Individual Values and How They Relate to the Community

This ongoing series shares the experiences of participants and facilitators in D-LAB (Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors), a student-facilitated program designed for first-year students to discover the relationship between leadership and personal values.

D-LAB's third and final session, "Know Your Community," prompted us to discuss our individual values and how these values relate to our membership in the Dartmouth community. In our first activity, we considered what three laws we would choose as guiding principles for a new society. This activity helped us mentally transcend Dartmouth's culture and consider what our ideal communities might look like.

MLDP Recap: Escaping the Dark Side of the Moon!

Read a student's account of our most recent session in our Management Leadership and Development program below. For more information about MLDP, click here.

The seventh session of MLDP this term featured a lecture from Professor John Garvey the Director of the Daniel Webster Scholar Honors Program at the University of New Hampshire School of Law. Prior to the session, we were assigned a reading—an excerpt from Getting Past NO! by William Ury. Professor Garvey supplied us with handouts over the course of the session on which we took notes. One was a sheet that stated "The Six Stages of Negotiation," which outlined all the steps of effective negotiation that Prof. Garvey talked about. I thought this was one of the most beneficial and memorable parts of the session because it's something that we can always review after the session in order to reaffirm the lessons that we learned.

Recap: Professor Robin West Calls for a Public Re-conception of Civil Rights

"What is the nature of the rights, jurisdictionally, that the 1964 Civil Rights Act proscribes?" Robin West, the Frederick J. Haas Professor of Law and Philosophy at Georgetown University Law Center, asked at the start of her lecture. Throughout her presentation, West called for a re-conception of how people understand civil rights, and how to view civil rights as a way to argue not just for what the state is doing, but what the state should be doing.

West argued that, presently, we understand civil rights primarily on the basis of discrimination, which means we miss the underlying right. There must be a right to something beyond the right to not be the victim of discrimination. In regards to education, civil rights must affirm our right to an education and not stop at protecting us from discrimination.

West defined civil rights using the writings of 18th-century author and political activist Thomas Paine. Paine argued that civil rights are natural human rights owed to the people by the government based on the very nature of their membership in society. 

MLDP Recap: Maximizing the Tools at Your Disposal to Enhance Your Presentation

Read a student's account of our most recent session in our Management Leadership and Development program below. For more information about MLDP, click here

RBEL Recap: Senior Policy Lecturer Charles Wheelan '88 speaks about his transformation into a journalist

This event was sponsored by the Rockefeller Business and Entrepreneurial Leadership (RBEL), a student discussion group that meets every Wednesday evening. For more information, click here.

Mini-Grants Recap: Discussing the Strategic and Political Challenges to Arms Control in the Middle East

Ala Alrababah (second from left) along with other panelists

This opportunity was funded by the Rockefeller Mini-Grants Program. For more information, please click here. 

Presenting at a panel and a scholarly conference on my research was a particularly valuable experience. My research, which I did while interning at the Center for Nonproliferation Studies, focused on the strategic and political challenges to arms control in the Middle East. I discussed the traditional challenges that existed before the Arab uprisings. 

One main challenge is the trust deficit among countries in the Middle East, which prevents them from cooperating on arms control. Another challenge relates to timing. Should arms control be implemented before or after a lasting peace agreement in the Middle East? Moreover, specific countries have their own concerns with arms control. 

Mini-Grants Recap: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change conference

Leehi Yona (second from right) at a press conference
during the COP19 United Nations climate conference in
Warsaw.

This opportunity was funded by the Rockefeller Mini-Grants Program. For more information, please click here.

My experience at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change conference (UNFCCC COP19) in Warsaw, Poland, was indescribable. I'm deeply interested in the intersectionality of climate change from social, political, scientific, and health-related perspectives, and being given the opportunity to attend a series of international negotiations helped ground my understanding of the policies surrounding these issues.

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The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences