The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Senior Honors Thesis Grants

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Samantha Hussey '20

Samantha Hussey, a member of the Class of 2020, is a Sociology major and Government and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies double minor from Kāneʻohe, Hawaiʻi, who is interested in the interplay of race, gender, and socioeconomic status within social interactions and identities.

Through her thesis, she will use a mixed methods approach to investigate Dartmouth’s social scene and its effects on students’ social identities in order to answer: What factors create and influence Dartmouth’s social hierarchy and labels; how do social hierarchies and labels influence students' social identities; and how are such hierarchical rankings and labels reinforced by members of the Dartmouth community?

On campus, Hussey is involved with The Dartmouth, School House Executive Board, Kappa Delta Epsilon Sorority, Movement Against Violence, Native Americans at Dartmouth, and Hokupaʻa.

After graduating from Dartmouth, Hussey plans to attend law school with hopes of pursuing a career in employment or labor law. Advisor: Janice McCabe

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Alyssa Gao '20

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Alyssa Gao, a member of the Class of 2020, is from Chicago, Illinois, pursuing a major in Environmental Studies and minors in Public Policy and Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies.

Gao was inspired to write a thesis during her internship at the Brookings Institution, where she conducted research on transparency, accountability, and participation efforts in the natural resource sector. Her thesis will examine the diversity policies and practices of leading environmental advocacy organizations in Washington, D.C.

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Todd Huang '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Todd Huang, a member of the Class of 2019, is a geography and biochemistry major from Vancouver, Canada.

Todd is passionate about critical ethnic studies, Asian American studies, and urban geography. His thesis engages the complicated webs of real estate speculation, race, life, and neoliberalism. Todd's advisor is the Joan P. and Edward J. Foley Jr. 1933 Professor of Geography Mona Domosh.

On campus, Todd is involved in Asian/American Students for Action, the Dartmouth Symphony Orchestra, the Dartmouth Radical, and the Inter-Community Council. After Dartmouth, Todd intends to pursue a doctoral degree in geography to continue his studies in gentrification, race, and biopolitics.

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Lucia Caballero Guiu '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Lucía Caballero, a member of the Class of 2019, is pursuing a double major in Geography and Government. Her studies have focused on immigration and refugee rights, political geography, and social justice.

As a Venezuelan and Spanish dual citizen, Lucia has always had an interest in international issues, and her studies at Dartmouth have helped her narrow this interest down to focusing on feminist geopolitics and critical ethnic studies. Her senior honors thesis will seek to understand the border politics of Colombia and Venezuela, given the Venezuelan refugee crisis of the last couple of years. Lucia's advisor is Garnet Kindervater, a Lecturer in the Department of Geography.

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Jovanay Carter '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Jovanay Carter, a member of the Class of 2019, has developed a project which highlights the experiences of black ballerinas in the United States from the mid-20th century to the contemporary era. Jovanay plans to emphasize a small part of the cultural experience of blacks in America to highlight key themes of class, race, gender, intersectionality, power dynamics, body politics, and the myth of the black superwoman.

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Jennifer Wu '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Jennifer Wu, a member of the Class of 2019, is a Quantitative Social Science (QSS) major and a Government and Japanese minor.

Jennifer is interested in political psychology, public opinion, and political methodology and her QSS senior thesis looks at how people react to civil comments from a politician compared to uncivil comments, and how much of a difference it makes to the public if politicians apologize for their uncivil comments. Furthermore, it will look at whether in-group/out-group characteristics, specifically gender of respondent and politician, moderate how favorably people view a politician after an apology compared to no apology. Her advisor is Government Professor Yusaku Horiuchi, the Mitsui Professor of Japanese Studies.

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Genna Liu '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Genna Liu, a member of the Class of 2019, is a Quantitative Social Science and Economics major.

Genna is interested in using quantitative analysis to understand issues relating to immigration, trade, and policy. After becoming interested in survey methodology through the Government DSP, she is conducting a survey experiment using conjoint analysis and framing treatments to examine Americans' immigration policy preferences and how it is affected by immigration framing. Her advisor is Government Professor Yusaku Horiuchi, the Mitsui Professor of Japanese Studies.

In addition to her QSS thesis, Genna's research also includes examining the relationship between uncertainty, immigration, and geographic mobility.

In the future, Genna hopes to attend graduate school to study more quantitative research methods.

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Evan Morgan '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Evan Morgan, a member of the Class of 2019, is a Quantitative Social Science major and History minor from San Clemente, California.

Using an online survey experiment, Evan seeks to determine the effect of stigmatizing language on drug policy preferences and perceptions of people who use drugs. This project continues his work studying the opioid overdose crisis. Evan previously did research at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy on the rise of opioid prescribing and is working on a project with Professor Brendan Nyhan to determine how localized drug conditions affect the behavior of legislators. As a Stamps Scholar, he runs a data journalism blog documenting the overdose crisis in New Hampshire. His advisor is Mia Costa, Assistant Professor in the Department of Government.

Outside the classroom, Evan works as an editor for The Dartmouth newspaper, plays cello in the symphony orchestra, and barely keeps pace with the triathlon team. He plans to pursue a career in data science.

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Teresa Alvarado-Patlan '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Teresa Alvarado-Patlan, a member of the Class of 2019, is a native of Zamora, Michoacan, Mexico who currently resides in the Suburbs of Chicago. She is a Latin American, Latino, & Caribbean Studies (LALACS) major and a French minor. Alvarado-Patlan is a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Associate Fellow and serves as a student member of the Committee on Standards in the Office of Judicial Affairs.

Her thesis focuses on the evolution of the Department of Homeland Security - from an agency enforcing strict immigration laws and border security to combating terrorism, to its current agenda targeting Latinx immigrants from the Northern Triangle countries of El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. Her advisor is Matt Garcia, Professor of History and Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies.

Senior Honors Thesis Grant Recipient: Benny Adapon '19

The Rockefeller Center Senior Honors Thesis Grants program provides funding of up to $1,000 for undergraduate students writing a senior honors thesis in the social sciences.

Benny Adapon ’19, an international student from Manila, Philippines, is an Associate Fellow with the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship conducting his senior honors thesis research in Geography.

Benny works in the fields of political ecology, geopolitics, critical development studies, and feminist care ethics – among others – and for his thesis studies the interactions between nonprofit development projects and local marine reserve politics in Sulu-an, Samar, Philippines. Having enjoyed his time in Geography at Dartmouth, Benny plans on pursuing a doctorate also in the same field to continue engaging with his theoretical and research interests whose seeds were planted in classes as early as his freshman year.

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