The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

SPRIG

O'Hara Discusses Problematic Alcohol Use and Risky Sexual Behavior from Adolescence to Adulthood at Winter SPRIG Faculty Workshop

Professor Ross O’Hara Discusses “Longitudinal Associations Between Problematic Alcohol Use and Risky Sexual Behavior from Adolescence to Adulthood" at SPRIG Faculty Workshop

On January 10, 2012, the Social Psychology Research Interest Group (SPRIG) Faculty Workshop hosted Dr. Ross O’Hara, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri. In his presentation, "Longitudinal Associations Between Problematic Alcohol Use and Risky Sexual Behavior from Adolescence to Adulthood," Dr. O’Hara discussed the effects of alcohol usage on an individual’s sexual behavior from adolescence into adulthood.

The Social Psychology Research Interest Group (SPRIG) is supported by the Rockefeller Center and includes faculty from the Psychological and Brain Sciences, Sociology, Economics, the Tuck School of Business, the Dartmouth Medical School, Philosophy, Computer Science, and Government. these workshops are focused on empirical research devoted to understanding social behavior broadly defined.

Professor Michele Tine Dicusses Research on Working Memory Differences at SPRIG Faculty Workshop

On June 7, 2011, the Social Psychology Research Interest Group (SPRIG) Faculty Workshop hosted Dr. Michele Tine, an Assistant Professor in the Education Department at Dartmouth College. In a presentation entitled "Uncovering Working Memory Differences in Rural and Urban Poverty", Professor Tine described an in-progress study of verbal and visual working memory among low-SES urban and rural children. The study shows that low-SES urban children seem to have larger overall working memory deficits, but low-SES rural children have particularly poor visual working memory. Professor Tine argued that it is important to determine the unique cognitive profiles of rural and urban children so that educational interventions can be effectively implemented and educational policies can be effectively designed based on local needs.

Professor Jeff Larsen Presents "The Case for Mixed Emotions" at SPRIG Faculty Workshop

On May 17, 2011, the Social Psychology Research Interest Group (SPRIG) Faculty Workshop hosted Dr. Jeff Larsen, an Associate Professor and Director of the Experimental Psychology Division at Texas Tech University. He presented "The Case for Mixed Emotions" and fielded questions from faculty members.

The Social Psychology Research Interest Group (SPRIG) is an interdisciplinary workshop devoted to research on social behavior. It is supported by the Rockefeller Center and includes faculty and graduate students from Psychological and Brain Sciences, Sociology, Economics, the Tuck School of Business, the Dartmouth Medical School, Philosophy, Computer Science, and Government. These workshops are focused on empirical research devoted to understanding social behavior broadly defined. The group has been convened by Jay Hull, Professor of Psychological & Brain Sciences, since 2003 with the assistance of Jane DaSilva of the Rockefeller Center for the Social Sciences.

Tuck School's Dr. Kopalle Presents "Expectations and Culture: The Effect of Belief in Karma in India" at Faculty Workshop

Dr. Praveen Kopalle, Professor of Marketing at the Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College, presented "Expectations and Culture: The Effect of Belief in Karma in India" at a Social Psychology Research Interest Group (SPRIG) faculty workshop on Tuesday, December 7, 2010.

Here he examined whether belief in karma and, consequently, having a long-term orientation, counteracts the tendency to lower expectations in two studies that measure and prime respondents' belief in karma. Results show that the extent of belief in karma, operating largely through its impact on long-run orientation, does moderate (decrease) the effect of disconfirmation sensitivity on expectations. These findings suggest that it is important to tailor advertising messages by matching them with customer expectations and their cultural determinants.

Prof. Jay Kralik Presents "The Evolution of Self-Regulation" at SPRIG Faculty Workshop

The first Social Psychology Research Interest Group (SPRIG) Faculty Workshop of the academic year was held on Tuesday, November 2, 2010.  Professor Jay Kralik, from the Dartmouth Psychological and Brain Sciences Department, presented the results of his ongoing research project, "The Evolution of Self-Regulation," to an audience that included scholars from psychological and brain sciences, anthropology, and economics, Dartmouth's professional schools, and many graduate students. 

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