The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

DLAB Leadership For Others, Part I

17W DLAB

Participants came to D-LAB Session 4 “Leadership for Others,” having ranked the top values of the Dartmouth community. Photo by Faith Rotich.

17W DLAB

D-LAB participants discuss what experiences they have had, as well as experiences they have not had, that led them to pick the top values of the Dartmouth community. Photo by Faith Rotich.

Participants came to session 4, titled “Leadership for Others,” having ranked the top values of the Dartmouth community. This differed from participants’ individual values, as the focus of the reflection was to consider how the College is perceived as a whole. Participants wrote the top 5 values on Post-It notes and then worked together to group the values in thematic buckets. In my group, the themes that emerged included personal growth, community, and achievement.

Following this activity, participants discussed what experiences they have had, as well as experiences they did not have, that led them to pick those particular values. In an effort to compare perceived values to the values the College wishes to uphold, participants then read through the Dartmouth Mission Statement. Participants discussed whether or not they believe Dartmouth upholds these values; one participant “graded” Dartmouth on each point.

Participants discussed the difference between values they personally selected, values they perceived the College to uphold, and values the administration prioritizes. The discussion led to a reflection on how the values the administration prioritizes can result in certain identities being prioritized. Participants talked in particular about how recruitment efforts for a diverse student body can be inhibited by Dartmouth’s reputation and location.

Submitted by Sarah Han '17, D-LAB Student Facilitator

 

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