The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Working memory differences between children living in rural and urban poverty

Faculty Scholarship
October 02, 2014
Michele
Tine
Department of Education

Executive Summary

Journal of Cognition and Development 15(4): 599-613

Author(s): Michele Tine

This study was designed to investigate if the working memory profiles of children living in rural poverty are distinct from the working memory profiles of children living in urban poverty. Verbal and visuospatial working memory tasks were administered to sixth-grade students living in low-income rural, low-income urban, high-income rural, and high-income urban developmental contexts. Both low-income rural and low-income urban children showed working memory deficits compared with their high-income counterparts, but their deficits were distinct. Low-income urban children exhibited symmetrical verbal and visuospatial working memory deficits compared with their high-income urban counterparts. Meanwhile, low-income rural children exhibited asymmetrical deficits when compared with their high-income rural counterparts, with more extreme visuospatial working memory deficits than verbal working memory deficits. These results suggest that different types of poverty are associated with different working memory abilities.

Notes

Rockefeller Center Faculty Grant Proposal: "Rural Urban Poverty- Distinct Effects on Working Memory"

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