The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Politics, Markets, and Populism: Antitrust at the Crossroads

Dartmouth Events

Politics, Markets, and Populism: Antitrust at the Crossroads

Commissioner Noah Joshua Phillips of the Federal Trade Commission delivers the Thurlow M. Gordon 1906 Lecture.

Wednesday, October 27, 2021
7:00pm-8:00pm
Room 003, Rockefeller Center
Intended Audience(s): Public
Categories:

This event will also be livestreamed: https://dartgo.org/noahphillips

Speaker:
Noah Joshua Phillips ’00
Commissioner
Federal Trade Commission

Host:
Herschel Nachlis
Research Assistant Professor of Government
Policy Fellow, The Rockefeller Center
Dartmouth College

Lecture Info:
Antitrust law is at a crossroads. Commissioner Noah Joshua Phillips of the Federal Trade Commission will reflect upon the goals of antitrust, the populist voices calling for reform, and whether the antitrust laws are equipped to solve every societal ill the reformists want competition law to address.

Speaker Bio:
Following his nomination by President Donald J. Trump and unanimous confirmation by the United States Senate, Noah Joshua Phillips was sworn in as a Commissioner on the Federal Trade Commission on May 2, 2018. Before coming to the FTC, Phillips served as Chief Counsel to U.S. Senator John Cornyn, of Texas, on the Senate Judiciary Committee. From 2011 to 2018, he advised Senator Cornyn on legal and policy matters including antitrust, constitutional law, consumer privacy, fraud, and intellectual property. Prior to his Senate service, Phillips worked as a litigator at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP, in New York City, and Steptoe & Johnson LLP, in Washington, D.C. Phillips began his career at Wasserstein Perella & Co., an investment bank in New York City. Phillips received his A.B. from Dartmouth College and his J.D. from Stanford Law School.

Host Bio:
Herschel Nachlis
is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Government and a Policy Fellow in the Rockefeller Center at Dartmouth.

He studies and teaches American politics and public law, focusing on institutions, health, and social policy. His work examines the policymaking capacities of American political institutions and how policymaking and regulatory bodies evolve over time, including with respect to public health provision, mental health care, and the opioid epidemic. 

He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in Politics and Social Policy from Princeton University, and B.A. in Political Science from Macalester College. Previously he was an Assistant Professor of Government at Franklin & Marshall College and a Postdoctoral Fellow in Dartmouth's Rockefeller Center.

 

For more information, contact:
Joanne Blais
603-646-1464

Events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.

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