The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

First-Year Fellow Mentor: Bobby Charles '82

FYF Mentor

Bobby Charles '82 served as a mentor to Class of 2018 First-Year Fellow, Sydney Walter.

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The First-Year Fellows program is a unique opportunity for first-year students to engage meaningfully in public policy early in their Dartmouth careers. Each year, around 20 students are selected and placed in fellowships with Dartmouth alumni in Washington, D.C., who are willing to take on a significant mentoring role. 

“Many people have helped me over the years to make career decisions. Many thoughtful and high powered people have paused to share their life lessons. And many did when I was still at Dartmouth. There is great joy in helping exceptional minds and hearts find the right mountain peak to aim for, the right paths to consider and then - for a time - helping them take the first steps up the path!” --Bobby Charles '82

Bobby Charles '82. First-Year Fellow Mentor since 2007.

Bobby Charles '82 rejoined The Charles Group, LLC as President in April, 2005 after serving from 2003 to 2005 as Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs under Secretaries Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice. His tenure in the Bush Administration led to the development of strong international relationships, which reinforce his strong ties with many in Congress and the administration. Charles received his J.D. from Columbia Law School, M.A. in Politics, Philosophy and Economics from Oxford University, and A.B. from Dartmouth College. Raised in Maine, he now lives in Maryland with his wife and two children.

The Charles Group has hosted the following First-Year Fellows:

  • Sydney Walter '18
  • Brian Li '17
  • Sakina Abu Boakye '16
  • Curtis King '16
  • Adam Nasser '15
  • Luke Decker '15
  • Brandon Debot '14
  • Andrew Longhi '14
  • Ellwood Hinman '13
  • Trevor Chenoweth '12
  • Andrew Clay '12
  • Zachary Stolzenberg '11
  • Clark Warthen '10

 

 

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