The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

The Multifaceted Nature of Entrepreneurship and Innovative Growth

Dean Glen Hubbard explains the relationship between entrepreneurship and economic growth. 

The audience asks Dean Hubbard questions about public polices that encourage entrepreneurial innovation. 

Article Type 

Analyzing business models, we realize there are many components to profitable success. At the core of these models is innovative business growth. Such entrepreneurial advancements encourage continual growth, living standards, and dynamism. Continual innovation pushes for higher aspirations, inspiring ideas and pushing for an invaluable economic vigor. The growth that comes with entrepreneurial ideals helps our businesses, communities and the American economy. But how does this really happen? How can we make this possible?

On Tuesday, October 4th, Dean of Columbia University Graduate School of Business Glenn Hubbard spoke on the multifaceted nature of entrepreneurship and innovative growth. Focusing on the definition of an entrepreneur, Hubbard relayed the relationship between entrepreneurship and economic growth. The ways that our economy fuels innovation and market growth is also tied into public policy and monetary actions. Hubbard questioned which policies best support this entrepreneurial innovation, even taking the 2016 presidential campaign into account. Dean Hubbard also reflected on the unique role that universities can play in the entrepreneurial process.

Glenn Hubbard is the Dean of Columbia University Graduate School of Business. From 2001 until 2003, he served as the chairman of the U.S. Council of Economic Advisers. Hubbard is currently co-chair of the Committee on Capital Markets Regulation. His business commentaries appear in Business Week, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, the Financial Times, the Washington Post, Nikkei, and the Daily Yomiuri.  

Submitted by Alexa Green ’19, Rockefeller Center Student Program Assistant for Public Programs

The views and opinions expressed and any materials presented during a public program are the speaker’s own and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of the Rockefeller Center or constitute an endorsement by the Center.

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