The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Rockefeller Board Member Todd Cranford '85 wins Dartmouth Alumni Award

Article Type 

As highlighted by the Office of Alumni Relations, Todd Cranford '85 was one of several notable winners of the Dartmouth Alumni Award for 2012 - 2013. For nearly 60 years, the Dartmouth Alumni Award has recognized graduates who have given their all to their alma mater.

From serving on reunion committees to interviewing prospective applicants, they volunteer in almost every way imaginable. Alumni are eligible for the award following their 25th class reunion, and are chosen by an Alumni Council committee comprised of past winners.

Todd Cranford '85

Todd Cranford ’85 was a government major during his time at Dartmouth, in addition to being chairman of the Afro-American Society, a member of Palaeopitus, a former DJ for WDCR, a member of the Gospel Choir, and a finalist for the Dean’s Prize.

He attended Columbia Law School and has enjoyed a successful legal career that has taken him from clerking for a U.S. District Court judge to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to his current position as counsel for Patton Boggs in Washington, D.C.

Even with such a busy life, Cranford finds time for his alma mater. He has served on the board of directors for both the New York and Washington, D.C., clubs, as co-chair for two class reunions, and as president of the Black Alumni of Dartmouth Association.

Cranford is a Young Alumni Distinguished Service Award winner and currently serves on the Rockefeller Center Board of Visitors and the Alumni Council’s Ad Hoc Committee on Diversity and Inclusion. “I’ve loved Dartmouth ever since the day I received my acceptance, and I’m very happy and privileged to be able to serve here,” says Cranford. “Fortunately, I have known a number of alumni who have set great examples for me when it comes to being involved with the College.”
Visit the Office of Alumni Relations to view the full article. 

Close
The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences